manual switchboard

manual switchboard

[′man·yə·wəl ′swich‚bȯrd]
(electricity)
Telephone switchboard in which the connections are made manually, by plugs and jacks, or by keys.
References in periodicals archive ?
For safety reasons, manual switchboard should provide protection against the effects of arc (minimum class AF) 16kA for a minimum of 1 second.
Call Center Comfort: Before there were cell phone towers there were manual switchboard operators who worked at long distance call exchange centers.
On the hospital side, a manual switchboard system left many callers aggravated because they couldn't get through quickly enough or to the appropriate departments.
Just as manual switchboard operators were superceded by automated switching and analogue voice signals have been replaced by digital voice, all voice calls will eventually be carried over converged, packet networks," Doherty said.
The automated solution, which replaces call transfer via a manual switchboard, typically cuts clients' operating costs in half, according to Trond Haaberget, director, Business Development for VIPcom, a division of Telenor Business Solutions.
The first automatic telephone switch that did not require manual operation was patented by Almon Strowger of Kansas City in 1891, but because of the perceived complexity of automatic circuit switching (and in some cases, simple inertia) manual switchboards remained in common use in many places until the middle of the 20th century.
But she soon cooled when she discovered he had been brought in to automate the manual switchboards and the operators decided to work to rule.
During the "time warp" day of its training, June 28, the 18th Field Hospital -- a cluster of tents and trucks eight miles deep amid the pines and dirt roads of this military reservation -- will supplement its World War II-era hand-cranked telephones and manual switchboards with pocket-size wireless telephones that outmode Radar O'Reilly-like PA sets, and put each of its doctors a button-push away from any other telephone in the world.
If we still had manual switchboards today we'd need twice the US population working as operators to handle our call volume," said William A.