ridge

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Related to marginal ridge: Oblique ridge, triangular ridge, transverse ridge

ridge

1. a long narrow raised land formation with sloping sides esp one formed by the meeting of two faces of a mountain or of a mountain buttress or spur
2. Anatomy any elongated raised margin or border on a bone, tooth, tissue membrane, etc.
3. 
a. the top of a roof at the junction of two sloping sides
b. (as modifier): a ridge tile
4. the back or backbone of an animal, esp a whale
5. Meteorol an elongated area of high pressure, esp an extension of an anticyclone

ridge

(scarp) See lobate ridge; wrinkle ridges.

Ridge

The horizontal lines at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof structures.

Ridge

 

a linearly extended upland, often with soft, rounded parts. Ridges are usually the remnants of mountain ranges that have been greatly eroded and then slightly uplifted (for example, the Timan Ridge and the Donets Ridge).

ridge

[rij]
(architecture)
The line on which the sides of a sloping roof meet.
(geology)
An elongate, narrow, steep-sided elevation of the earth's surface or the ocean floor.
(meteorology)
An elongated area of relatively high atmospheric pressure, almost always associated with, and most clearly identified as, an area of maximum anticyclonic curvature of wind flow. Also known as wedge.

ridge

1. The horizontal line at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof surfaces.
2. The internal angle or nook of a vault.
References in periodicals archive ?
PG preferences for a patient with a mesio-occlusal cavity in tooth 85 resulting in loss of more than half the marginal ridge and with a history of pulpal pain and with signs of pulpal involvement with an associated sinus the preferred option was extraction.
2007a] and particularly so when more than half the marginal ridge of the tooth had been lost.
Loss of marginal ridge integrity has been reported as the greatest contributing factor to loss of tooth strength; thus, whenever possible the ridge should be preserved in order to maintain tooth strength [Mondelli et al.
This result implies that in FMT, what is important is preserving the marginal ridge, such that in 2-surface cavities, in which fracture strength is significantly higher than 3-surface cavities, the thickness of cavity walls does not play a significant role in increasing fracture strength, but in 3-surface cavities with loss of both marginal ridges, preserving more thickness in cavity walls can result in a significant increase to fracture.