marginal weather


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marginal weather

Weather that is sufficiently adverse to a military or a commercial operation to require the imposition of procedural limitations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, everything seemed normal and besides, it wouldn't be the first time I flew form in marginal weather.
We expect the number of WAAS equipped aircraft to increase quickly, and pilots will be able to operate to and from airports that would otherwise be unavailable to them in marginal weather.
Primary Function: Combat search and rescue and military operations other than war in day, night, or marginal weather conditions Builder: United Technologies/Sikorsky Aircraft Company Power Plant: Two General Electric T700-GE-700 or T700-GE-701C engines Thurst: 1,560-1,940 shaft horsepower, each engine Length: 64 feet, 10 inches Height: 16 feet, 8 inches Roto Diameter: 53 feet, 8 inches Speed: 184 mph Maximum Takeoff Weight: 22,000 pounds Range: 445 statute miles; 504 nautical miles (unlimited with air refueling) Armament: Two 7.
To mitigate the risks in an environment characterized by marginal weather and rapid changes in prevailing visibility, we follow rules and SOPs put in place by OpNav 3710 and higher headquarters.
The new snow guns, dubbed the Hermanators, have the unique ability to make snow under marginal weather conditions.
The marginal weather is expected to get worse, he said.
The HGS system increases situational awareness and enhances safety by enabling pilots to fly head-up and to complete precise, stable approaches and landings, even in low visibility and marginal weather conditions.
When operating in marginal weather, your scan must include looking under your NVGs to see inadvertent IMC situations.
is a leader in advanced approach guidance systems, which provide increased pilot awareness and safety in low visibility and marginal weather conditions.
Relying too much on an inexperienced controller allowed us to get way out of parameters for an approach into marginal weather.
The title of this story ran through my mind while our flight of nine Tomcats were low on gas, in marginal weather, and looking for a place to land.
The demands of performing a difficult, non-precision approach at night, in marginal weather, with no autopilot, no ground proximity warning system, no altitude alerter, only one approach chart for the pilots to share, and an inexperienced First Officer, left little margin for error.