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bottom

1. Nautical touch bottom to run aground
2. Nautical the parts of a vessel's hull that are under water
3. (in literary or commercial contexts) a boat or ship
4. Billiards Snooker a strike in the centre of the cue ball
5. a dry valley or hollow
6. US and Canadian the low land bordering a river

bottom

[′bäd·əm]
(computer science)
The termination of a file.
(geology)
The bed of a body of running or still water.
(particle physics)
The new quantum number associated with the bottom quark. Also known as beauty.

Bottom

under spell, grows ass’s head. [Br. Lit.: A Midsummer Night’s Dream]

bottom

(theory)
The least defined element in a given domain.

Often used to represent a non-terminating computation.

(In LaTeX, bottom is written as \perp, sometimes with the domain as a subscript).
References in periodicals archive ?
The author shows several simple techniques, which can be used by visual inspection, to determine when the next market top and market bottom will occur.
stock market rallied on Monday as the session marked the one year anniversary of the 2009 market bottom.
The head of a Pennsylvania roofing company paid $165 per square foot for a 26-unit parcel of West Palm Beach condos, sparking hopes that a market bottom approaches.
Since the previous market bottom on July 15 and the rapid turn from energy to financials as market drivers, the most liquid stocks in the Russell 3000 as measured by average daily volume have underperformed the least liquid stocks by several percentage points.
our proprietary PMRA Market Bottom Indicator is currently showing a large positive divergence with the S&P 500 Index indicating that the overall market for stocks is definitely gaining strength.
Similarly, at a market bottom, the Momentum indicator will drop sharply and then begin to climb well ahead of prices.
Peart made waves 2 months ago by calling a market bottom and saying there would be no recession this year.
Hotel real estate prices have been relatively steady since 1991, typical of a market bottom.
Looking at the four occasions when US equities were particularly cheap - 1921, 1932, 1949 and 1982 - Russell Napier sets out to answer these questions by analysing every article in the "Wall Street Journal" from either side of the market bottom.
No matter how the media twists or spins the story, there is no denying that market bottom barometers have chimed the end of the home value landslide.
If that occurs, the combination of all of these events plus a host of other data points could suggest a significant market bottom may have occurred.
Read Gregory Spear's commentary regarding market bottoms and discover more stocks by clicking: http://at.