markup language

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markup language

[′märk‚əp ‚laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A set of rules and procedures for markup.

markup language

A set of labels that are embedded within text to distinguish individual elements or groups of elements for display or identification purposes. The labels are typically known as "tags."

For rendering (displaying and printing), markup languages indicate where font and other layout changes start and stop. For content identification, markup languages turn a text document into the equivalent of a database record in which individual data elements can be located for processing. In a database, elements are placed in a predefined structure. In a document, data elements reside in a freeform structure like text and must be identified with tags that mark their beginning and end.

It All Started with SGML
SGML is the granddaddy markup language that served as the foundation for HTML and XML. HTML is used for rendering the document, and XML is used for identifying the content of the document. See XML vocabulary, microformat, SGML, HTML and XML.
References in periodicals archive ?
A lot of the e-mail I receive is cluttered with graphics such as >>>>> or HTML markup tags, making it hard to read.
The receiver needs the markup tags to interpret the message: the format and content of database data, multimedia graphic files or audio files, debit card transactions, credit card authorizations, or any other various document types.
org's initial focus was to get an XML-based system of markup tags for financial statements up and running, Defining how to represent financial facts, such as cash, inside the rules of XML 1.
Content management systems that allow free-form editing enable an author to create and refine XML documents without a corresponding DTD, or document type definition, a type of file associated with SGML and XML documents that define how the markup tags should be interpreted by the application presenting the document.
When a text is keyboarded, this information can be embedded in the text at the time of capture in the form of encoding or markup tags.