marmalade


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marmalade

[Port.,=quince preparation], thick preserve of fruit pulp, originally made from quinces (marmelos) and known in England from the 15th cent. Marmalade has a jellylike consistency and a slightly bitter flavor, caused by including the rind of some tart fruit such as the Seville orange or the grapefruit. The name is also applied to various jams made tart by the addition of lemon juice or other acid ingredients.

marmalade

(of cats) streaked orange or yellow and brown
References in classic literature ?
I will first cut the pie for you; I am going to have muffin and marmalade," said Ribby.
She pronounced the tea to be excellent, and praised the exquisite taste in which the marmalade was arranged in the saucers.
There was also ham and marmalade and bread, so that he had a really very tolerable breakfast indeed.
The gentleman who was spreading the marmalade returned, without looking up from that occupation, 'What did he call the Dog?
There was a highly seasoned stew with meat and vegetables, a dish of fresh fruit, and a bowl of milk beside which was a little jug containing something which resembled marmalade.
Next, aided by anxious sailors, he and Daughtry dropped into the lazarette through the cabin floor, and began breaking out and passing up a stream of supplies--cases of salmon and beef, of marmalade and biscuit, of butter and preserved milk, and of all sorts of the tinned, desiccated, evaporated, and condensed stuff that of modern times goes down to the sea in ships for the nourishment of men.
Bucket lays in a breakfast of two mutton chops as a foundation to work upon, together with tea, eggs, toast, and marmalade on a corresponding scale.
Marmalade gathers all of his magazines and dildos and puts them in his briefcase.
Until now, the German-language version of Directive 2001/113/EC insisted that the term Marmelade referred only to marmalade made from citrus fruit.
Marmalade Glenn Fleshler Sookie, Emily, Sunflower Heidi Dippold Bradley Marc Victor George, Cactus, A Man Larry Bates Larry Guilford Adams
Berger understands the limitations of a diner who has just conquered a four or five course dinner, "We give them a lot of food, so they want something light, not heavy; a little sweet and a little freshness, that's why fruit compote and marmalade are good, not too sweet and very light.
Researchers now speculate that eating orange marmalade may do the same thing.