marsh marigold


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marsh marigold,

perennial spring-blooming Old World and North American plant (Caltha palustris) of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercupbuttercup
or crowfoot,
common name for the Ranunculaceae, a family of chiefly annual or perennial herbs of cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Thought to be one of the most primitive families of dicotyledenous plants, the Ranunculaceae typically have a simple
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 family), found in wet places. It has rounded glossy leaves and large buttercuplike flowers of bright and shining yellow. The tops are reputed to be toxic but with boiling become edible and are often eaten as greens while young; the flower buds have been pickled and used as capers, and the flowers have been used for beverages. In the United States it is sometimes called cowslip. Other species of Caltha are also called marsh marigold. Marsh marigolds are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Ranunculales, family Ranunculaceae.
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marsh marigold

marsh marigold

WARNING (note- there is another plant also called cowslip) Yellow buttercup-like flowers with hollow stem that grows near water. This plant can blister skin, but if used correctly, has been used for coughs and snakebite. Laxative and diuretic. TOXIC unless boiled in multiple changes of water. Be careful. Survival food if boiled. There is another plant called Marsh Marigold (Caltha leptosepala)
References in periodicals archive ?
This four-year-old lost nothing in defeat at Leicester eight days ago where he was beaten a neck by Marsh Marigold, and compensation surely awaits here.
Choose a combination of the following native pond and bog plants: spiked water milfoil, water starwort, rigid hornwort, potamogeton, frog bit, water plantain, yellow flag iris, marsh marigold, ragged robin, meadow sweet and purple loosestrife.
Stock the pond with oxygenators plus bold-leaved marginals such as Iris pseudacorus, the citrus-scented Houttuynia Chameleon and marsh marigold to compliment the exotic theme.
Wild irises, arrowhead and the wonderful marsh marigold are the best bets.
The roll call included meadow fox-tail, sweet vernal grass, downy oat grass, wood horse-tail, red fescue, crested dog's-tail, wood anemone, bugle, floating sweet grass, sharp flowered rush, ragged robin, wood cranesbill, marsh marigold, globe flower, yellow rattle, adder's tongue fern, and moonwort.
Marsh Marigold may have been a 33-1 chance for the handicap hurdle, but her victory came as no surprise to trainer Joe Fierro.
Then you'll want the more simply named marsh marigolds, wild irises and arrowhead.
The site has been planted with hydrangeas, rhododendrons and willows, as well as foxgloves, ferns, harebells, meadowsweet, iris, marsh marigolds and forget-me-nots.
In the spring, scores of yellow marsh marigolds grow between the rocks but in late fall only the mosses show green.
Primulas and marsh marigolds are in abundance in spring while you have unspoilt countryside whichever way you look.
I had moved a clump of Marsh Marigolds (Caltha palustris) that fateful afternoon, part of the buttercup family, some members of which are poisonous.
Next up are the marginals, like marsh marigolds, wild irises and arrowhead, which sit on the shelves and provide foliage above the water.