helophyte

(redirected from marsh plant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

helophyte

[′he·lə‚fīt]
(ecology)
A marsh plant; buds overwinter underwater.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
2:00 RESPONSE OF MARSH PLANTS TO CD-SPIKED SEDIMENTS: EFFECTS ON SITE PARTITIONING EFFECTS OF METALS AND BIOAVAILABILITY
Determinants of pattern in a New England salt marsh plant community.
The potential effects of factors unrelated to tidal inundation render elevational boundaries of native marsh plants unattractive as a general criterion for defining the upper edge of tidally influenced habitat.
The effect of a spill depends on a host of variables, including the kind of oil that washes into the marsh, the number of times marsh plants are exposed to the oil, the parts of the plant that are exposed and the weather patterns that move the slick around.
Among the topics are research studies on exhaust emission from the heavy duty diesel engine fueled by biodiesel, lessons from genetics on preserving the biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems in a scenario of increasing desertification, how phytocaps reduce methane emission from landfills, internalizing externalities of energy systems in a comprehensive modeling approach to re-orienting the choices of energy-economics markets, assessment and monitoring tools for urban and forest trees, the role of salt marsh plants and microorganisms in sediment metal biogeochemistry, and using ground-penetrating radar to investigate pollutant leakage at Songshuling Landfill in Huzhou.
Alfred Ernest Schuyler, the Academy's curator emeritus of botany, said that the plant Scirpus deltarum or delta bulrush has detoxification properties that could decompose the oil and protect the marsh plants.
It breeds in broad, dense, young willow and tamarisk stands, forages among marsh plants like cattails, and migrates along the lifelines of desert streams.
Additionally, sturdy flipbooks identify and interpret the most common birds, amphibians, reptiles, and marsh plants likely to be visible from the deck.
Huang and her colleagues grew cattails and horsetails, types of marsh plants, at different temperatures in climate-controlled chambers.
The cost of projects can vary considerably from about $9,000 per acre to plant marsh plants to almost $54,000 per acre to restore barrier islands.