helophyte

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helophyte

[′he·lə‚fīt]
(ecology)
A marsh plant; buds overwinter underwater.
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2:00 RESPONSE OF MARSH PLANTS TO CD-SPIKED SEDIMENTS: EFFECTS ON SITE PARTITIONING EFFECTS OF METALS AND BIOAVAILABILITY
The effect of competition and salinity on the growth of a salt marsh plant species.
Birds also benefit from increased plant cover in marshes; for example, in southern California the state-listed endangered Belding's Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis beldingi) uses several marsh plant species for nesting habitat (Powell, 1993).
Many studies have documented intense competition at borders between salt marsh plant s (Silander and Antonivics 1982, Bertness and Ellison 1987, Bertness 1991a, b, Pennings and Callaway 1992), and growth of most species in our experiments appeared poorer in competition than in other habitats.
The research described in this paper was designed to examine the establishment of a marsh plant community following the accretion of sediment during floods.
Although we collected data on all marsh plant species, here we present only data on the most ubiquitous species (the native succulents Salicornia virginica and Arthrocnemum subterminale, the invasive grass, Parapholis incurva, and a grouping of transition/ upland species that included the native rush, Juncus bufonius, non-native grasses Polypogon monspeliensis, Lolium multiflorum, Bromus diandrus, and B.
Salicornia virginica is a slow growing salt marsh plant species that grows at the lower marsh elevations.
To evaluate the causes of this salt marsh plant species diversity pattern across intertidal zones, we designed our experiments to answer the question: "Why are there differences in species number and composition among intertidal zones?
A great deal of research has been conducted on the abilities of individual marsh plant species to tolerate high salinity regimes and/or flooded conditions (e.
The research presented here examined the effects of fertilization and herbivory on two coastal marsh plant communities of similar productivity levels, but differing species pools due to different ambient salinity levels.
Salt stress limitation of seedling recruitment in a salt marsh plant community.