masonry nail

masonry nail

[′mās·ən·rē ‚nāl]
(design engineering)
Spiral-fluted nail designed to be driven into mortar joints in masonry.

masonry nail

masonry nail
A hardened-steel nail with a knurled or fluted shank; esp. used for fastening to masonry.
References in periodicals archive ?
IF YOUR walls are hard and bend picture hook fixings, use a masonry nail instead.
Remember the eccentric Bluenose, who used to throw masonry nails at a dartboard in English pubs to make a living?
They had uncovered masonry nails, roof tiles, parts of walls, a host of pottery and a stone which was once part of the 18th century Paxton mansion.
Another thing to remember when it comes to masonry nails is that they are a permanent fixing and are very difficult to remove without damaging the masonry.
It's best to secure your trellis with blocks of wood, these can be attached to the wall with masonry nails or screws, then hook or nail the trellis on to these blocks.
Masonry anchors can be drilled in or short masonry nails can be used.
Temporarily tack masonry nails every metre under the cornice as you work round the room as the adhesive dries.
Fix the battens to the wall, using screws or masonry nails, each one at 600mm intervals from the floor.
These wood strips not only take the masonry nails that secure the board to the wall but also provide a way to secure drywall directly to the insulated wall--without any conventional framing.
Builder Fred Arevalos set 2-by-6 plates with masonry nails, then built a 2-by-4 frame for six 4- by 8-foot ready-made lath panels; horizontal 2-by-2 braces provide midpanel support.
The eccentric Bluenose once made a living throwing four-inch masonry nails at a dartboard and holds the world record for an 11-nail checkout.
You may have to add a few masonry nails to give the climber some extra support as it grows up the pipe and the foliage gets heavier.