mass bleaching

mass bleaching

[¦mas ′blēch·iŋ]
(invertebrate zoology)
A disease affecting coral reefs in which a reduction in the number of zooxanthellae (symbiotic plants) causes corals to lose their characteristic brown color over a period of several weeks and take on a brilliant white appearance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following news the federal government would spend $60 million over the next 18 months to tackle mass bleaching and sediment runoff, Ms Enoch said the investment is a starting point, but more is needed from Canberra.
Much of the World heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef off Australias northeast coast has been left a white graveyard due to unusually high ocean temperatures causing mass bleaching of coral expanses in 1998, 2002, 2016 and 2017.
The bureau also restated that the Great Barrier Reef had suffered a coral mass bleaching in early 2017 due to rising ocean temperatures.
Warming waters and higher levels of carbon in the water can cause mass bleaching events that kill off coral.
It takes at least a decade for a full recovery of even the fastest growing corals, so mass bleaching events 12 months apart offers zero prospect of recovery for reefs that were damaged in 2016," says James Kerry, a scientist with the center who undertook the aerial surveys.
Earlier this year, Australia's Great Barrier Reef suffered the worst mass bleaching event in recorded history.
This year is the third time in 18 years that the Great Barrier Reef has experienced mass bleaching due to global warming, and the current event is much more extreme than we've measured before," said Hughes.
Researchers from James Cook University (JCU) in northern Queensland state and Sweden's University of Uppsala have been investigating the mechanism behind community structure changes on the Great Barrier Reef that have coincided with the current mass bleaching event.
In a mass bleaching "event" in 1998 more than 50% of the Great Barrier Reef was hit and more than 15% of the world's coral died.
This suggests that mass bleaching is related to global climate changes (Oxenford et al.
Spatial and temporal variability during periods of "recovery" after mass bleaching on Western Atlantic coral reefs.