mass wasting


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mass wasting

[′mas ‚wāst·iŋ]
(geology)
Dislodgement and downslope transport of loose rock and soil material under the direct influence of gravitational body stresses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mass Wasting is the downward movement of rock and soil, often mixed with water.
Chapter two goes into greater detail to explain the many categories of separate types of mass wasting and slides, creep, slumps and avalanches.
Chapter 3 goes into detail regarding causes for Mass Wasting.
After describing the centuries-old process of mass wasting that shaped the landscape, Han writes in his essay that the flower "shows that while nature can be destructive, it also finds ways to make it possible for life to continue.
Decomposition was apparently interrupted by mass wasting that buried the carcasses.
This indicates that the corpses were buried by a mass wasting event, possibly due to torrential rain.
Then the sea lion carcasses would have been buried by a mass wasting episode, possibly due to torrential rain.
Sidle (Kyoto University) describes the natural factors influencing landslides, the initiation mechanisms of slope failures and landslides, methods of assessing landslide hazards, and the major land use activities that globally influence mass wasting and affect slope stability.
The potential for erosion, mass wasting, landslides, mud flows and slope failures are clearly evident in the geological map of the property,'' according to his report.
Cargo and Mallory (19977) observed that most examples of mass wasting have resulted from the addition of water into the ground to the point that the strength of the material is reduced beyond its ability to withstand the force of gravity.
Mass wasting has also created delicate erosion of the highest part of the walls.
The researchers analysed the structure of the seabed and discovered active submarine canyons, mass wasting, landslides, and sediment slumps related to tectonic processes and earthquake activity.