masseter

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masseter

[mə′sēd·ər]
(anatomy)
The masticatory muscle, arising from the zygomatic arch and inserted into the lower jaw.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spastic movement disorders such as cerebral palsy frequently lead to bruxism with masseter muscle hypertonia.
Using T-scan and EMG, the tooth contact sequence, changing occlusal forces, and fluctuating muscle activity levels of the temporalis and masseter muscle were recorded from an intercuspation followed by excursive movements till the muscle shutdown occurred.
The facial NEMG values of the masseter muscle were significantly greater at a workload of 200 W compared with those at the other four power outputs; however, they were not significantly different between 160 W and 120 W or between 80 W and 40 W.
For example, a patient presenting with pain in the TMJ and masseter muscle could be seen by a chiropractor as a TMD, but a dentist would check to be sure the patient's teeth were not abscessed before diagnosing a TMD.
Influence of experimental interfering occlusal contacts on the activity of the anterior temporal and masseter muscles during submaximal and maximal bite in the intercuspal position.
Ag-AgCl electrodes significant 2011 placed along right and differences in any 15/20 left masseter muscles measured parameters with 2mm gap (10500Hz, before and after KT 5000Hz, 5K[ohm], 120 dB) applications KT applied posterior to TMJ with no tension to mouth and along jaw line to TMJ with 0-15% tension Fu Measured MVC Lowest peak torque in et al.
18) observed that neuromuscular reprogramming devices did not alter the electromyographic patterns of the temporalis and masseter muscles in a period of 15 minutes.
Subjects reached maximum force level in two seconds by slightly increasing biting force, and then contracted masseter muscles maximally.
05, indicating that subjects were inclined to react physiologically at the masseter muscles when moving from silence to the heavy metal music.
who has many years of experience with the New York University College of Dentistry and the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Medical Center, TMD has three basic causes: malocculsions or improper wisdom tooth alignment; anatomical problems may exist and the joint itself could be misaligned; or stress may lead to muscle spasm and grinding, causing the internal and external pterygoid and masseter muscles to go into spasm-causing pain.