mastectomy

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Related to mastectomies: total mastectomy

mastectomy

(măstĕk`təmē), surgical removal of breast tissue, usually done as treatment for breast cancercancer,
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to body mechanisms that limit cell growth.
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. There are many types of mastectomy. In general, the farther the cancer has spread, the more tissue is taken. The radical mastectomies of the past (which removed not only the breast, but underlying chest muscle and lymph nodes) have largely been replaced by less drastic, but equally effective procedures. For small tumors, lumpectomy, removing just the tumor and a margin of tissue, may be performed. A partial, or segmental, mastectomy removes the cancer, some breast tissue, the lining over the chest, and usually some lymph nodes from under the arm; total or simple mastectomy removes the whole breast; modified radical mastectomy takes the breast, lining over the chest muscles, and lymph nodes.

Breast reconstruction can be done using the patient's own tissue or breast implantsbreast implant,
saline- or silicone-filled prosthesis used after mastectomy as a part of the breast reconstruction process or used cosmetically to augment small breasts.
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. Mammograms and self-conducted breast exams have done much to reduce the need for radical procedures because they have increased early detection of the cancer, allowing it to be treated before it has spread.

mastectomy

[ma′stek·tə·mē]
(medicine)
Surgical removal of the breast. Also known as mammectomy.

mastectomy

the surgical removal of a breast
References in periodicals archive ?
Of 57 hospitals that had the highest number of patients, the proportion of failed breast conservation surgery in these hospitals ranged from 3% to 32%, while the proportion of mastectomies for small tumours ranged from 0% to 60%.
Yes, if your group health plan covers mastectomies and you are receiving benefits in connection with a mastectomy.
Ms Dunn added that an external panel of two external and independent breast surgeons and an oncologist carried out the investigation, reviewing case notes of those patients who may have had cleavage sparing mastectomies.
Bleicher said it is not clear why these women had mastectomies rather than lumpectomies, but it may be related to the higher sensitivity of the MRIs, which are known to have a high number of false-positive findings.
SURGEONS HAVE OFTEN BEEN ACCUSED OF UNNECESSARILY PERFORMING TOTAL MASTECTOMIES.
He details their arrogance towards their female patients, accuses them of a "cavalier masculine certainty" about the efficacy of radical surgery even when it was under significant attack, and notes that in Europe, with many more female oncologists than in the United States, radical mastectomies are much less often performed.
The study compared 469 patients who had undergone chemotherapy and postoperative radiation after their mastectomies to 1,031 patients who had no post-operative radiation.
Long-term survival rates among women who have undergone breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy for early-stage disease are similar to those of women who have had mastectomies.
As a result, many women undergo mastectomies for cancers that could be treated just as well with a lumpectomy and radiation, he says.
Patient advocacy groups, along with some clinicians and policymakers, have argued that too many women receive mastectomies.
The BPF's mission is to educate women about skin-sparing mastectomies and its advantages for an overall better cosmetic result.
This increase in bilateral mastectomies with reconstruction resulted in an adjusted 34% jump in the overall mastectomy rate during 2004-2011 as compared with 1998-2003.