masticate

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masticate

[′mas·tə‚kāt]
(chemical engineering)
To process rubber on a machine to make it softer and more pliable before mixing with other substances.
(physiology)
To chew.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dumping temperatures of chemically masticated NR were about 20 [degrees] C lower than those of the rubbers masticated without peptizing agent.
Because of the lack of skid trails in mastication treatments and because only one machine, instead of two, passed over the masticated areas, we expected to find that the mastication treatments had a noticeably lower effect on soil strength.
Masticated NR and PP (50/50 wt%) were used to prepare the blends by a batch process in a Haake Rheomix internal mixing chamber, having a volume of 50 [cmsup.
That is, indeed, the tale being related here after it's been masticated, musicalized and generally messed with by the Troubadour Theater Company, whose presentation of ``Much Adoobie Bothers About Nothing'' (The Bard meets Guy Allison, Tom Johnston and the boys.
Parents spend years trying to teach their kids not to speak with their mouths full for the simple reason that it looks foul and it tends to cover people in masticated food.
By his Iraq attack, Tony Blair seems to have totally masticated the concept of political integrity in national and international politics.
Failure results in horses not eating their food properly which can cause problems like quid ding (where partially chewed food is emitted from the mouth indicating a dental problem), to impaction colic,caused by the food not having been properly masticated.
HE'S munched his way through moth pupae, waded through a plate of worms, retched over red ants and masticated maggots.
Coffea arabica originated in the Ethiopian highlands, where the raw, unroasted beans were masticated and the leaves brewed like tea by the locals.
The masticated and divinely invigorated species then "spread their forces into every part"; but it is grace, the commander-in-chief, that breaches the stronghold and secures both the soul's terrain and a hitherto "rebel-flesh.
He wrote that allowing multimedia properties in the same market allows all sorts of synergies, which he said "is corporate-speak for repackaging and cross-promoting the hell out of your product: newspaper copy can become television fodder that can be masticated into radio and Internet items that can promote the original print version, and on and on in a merry and very lucrative circle.