mastoiditis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

mastoiditis

inflammation of the mastoid process

Mastoiditis

 

inflammation of the mastoid cells of the temporal bone, affecting the mucous membrane and bony tissue. Most ofter mastoiditis is a complication of a purulent inflammation of the middle ear. Primary mastoiditis arises as a result of trauma to the mastoid process or when infection from sepsis, syphilis, or tuberculosis penetrates by hematogenic means. Symptoms include sharp pain when pressure is applied to the anterosuperior part of the process or to its apex, reddening of the skin, swelling, flabbiness, and protrusion of the auricles forward and downward. In children the temperature rises to 39°-40°C; in adults it often remains normal. Treatment consists of administering antibiotics. If there is prolonged suppuration from the ear (three or four weeks) or at the first signs that infection has spread to the labyrinth and the meninges, treatment is surgical.

mastoiditis

[‚ma‚stȯi′dīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the mastoid cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
1999) Impact of resistant pneumococcus on rates of acute mastoiditis.
Radiographic findings of mastoiditis range from subtle changes of mastoid air cell opacification to the more profound changes of osseous destruction, subperiosteal abscess formation, coalescent mastoiditis, and, in some cases, venous infarctions as well as parenchymal abscesses (1-3).
Usual predisposing factors for intracranial abscess include congenital heart disease, intrathoracic infection and chronic otitis or mastoiditis.
Risk factors for cervicofacial actinomycosis include poor dental hygiene, dental procedures, chronic tonsillitis, otitis, mastoiditis, maxillofacial trauma, and immunocompromise.
tuberculosis was cultured from 1 HIV-negative child, who also had coalescent mastoiditis and a subperiosteal abscess but did not have facial nerve palsy.
My mother was one of the early recipients of 'sulpha-drugs' when she nearly died from mastoiditis as a child, although surgery was the mainstay of her treatment.
Antibiotic prescribing in general practice and hospital admissions for peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, and rheumatic fever in children: time trend analysis.
Treatment failure in AOM can lead to recurrent and persistent OM, hearing loss, persistent middle ear effusion necessitating ventilation tube insertion, mastoiditis, bacteremia, sepsis, and various intracranial complications, such as meningitis and brain abscess.
pneumoniae infection almost always requires antibiotic therapy and often leads to complications such as mastoiditis.
As such, primary care physicians and even otolaryngologists may find these clinical features more suggestive of bacterial otitis media and mastoiditis, when in fact these findings can represent a fungal infection of the EAC.
Complications evaluated were pneumonia, quinsy and mastoiditis.
All 10 immunocompetent patients had chronic respiratory tract disease; cystic fibrosis (n = 5), bronchiectasis (n = 4) and chronic mastoiditis (n = 1).