Masturbation


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Masturbation

 

(also onanism), a surrogate form of sexual satisfaction in which the erogenous zones—most often the genital organs—are artificially stimulated for the purpose of producing orgasm. Masturbation is widespread in the animal world. Most often in humans it is practiced at the age of puberty and no longer after a sex life is established. It is associated principally with sociosexual disharmony, which is caused by an awakening of sexuality before the individual is socially mature. The negative effects of masturbation are caused primarily by fear of consequences and can lead to neurosis.

G. S. VASIL’CHENKO

References in periodicals archive ?
Graham told MNT that in her previous research, she had 'found striking gender differences in factors associated with frequency of masturbation in men and women.
has been known to make light of sometimes lewd topics in his comedy, and the comedian touched on masturbation in a 2011 episode of his hit dramedy "Louie," in which he appeared on a fictionalized Fox News episode of "Red Eye" with Greg Gutfeld.
Canonical works by Thomas Laqueur (Solitary Sex: A Cultural History of Masturbation [2003]) and G.
A clean-catch urine sample was collected from each child for analysis and culture after the diagnosis of masturbation was confirmed.
I thought the only way forward was to treat my son equally to other disabled persons and apply the professional advice given to other profoundly disabled persons, namely, therapeutic masturbation to relieve and gratify my son's sexual expression.
He recalled the priests' stern condemnations of masturbation (by young teens with raging hormones, who had no available outlet in marriage).
In another passage Foucault captures the distaste for masturbation in Western culture and the association of the practice with pathological aberrations necessitating control and cure:"First there was medicine, via the "nervous disorders"; next psychiatry, when it set out to discover the etiology of mental illness, focusing its gaze first on "excess", then onanism, then frustration, then 'frauds against procreation,' but especially when it annexed the whole of the sexual perversions as its own provinces; criminal justice, too, which had long been concerned with sexuality, particularly in the forms of "heinous" crimes and crimes against nature" (30).
This indicates that while a significant proportion of asexual individuals appear to have a low sex drive or lack sexual interest (Bogaert, 2006), some degree of desire for masturbation remains.
Although Shelton (2010) noted that the health community should not neglect masturbation as a safe way to prevent AIDS and unwanted pregnancies, masturbation remains imbued with negative associations.
Nasawiya, a local feminist collective that supports assorted anti-harassment campaigns, when contacted online for assistance and/or comment on the topic, gave the curt reply: "Your questions on public masturbation are really strange.
Given that it is forty years, more or less, since popular works such as Stephen Marcus's The Other Victorians (1966) and Alex Comfort's The Anxiety Makers (1968) drew attention to the pervasiveness of the medical and popular discourses on masturbation in Victorian culture, it is somewhat surprising that relatively little attention has been paid to the impact of these discourses upon literary texts.
But unlike our driver, who discussed masturbation so readily, as a global health community we too often obediently bow to the social taboo that masturbation is a topic to be avoided.