maternal

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maternal

[mə′tərn·əl]
(biology)
Of, pertaining to, or related to a mother.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maternalism also characterizes Gandhi's attitude toward Hindus in the Hindu-Muslim conflict.
Where the old paternalism chastised pointedly, the new maternalism smothers massively.
Harper, 1976]; Nancy Chodorow, The Reproduction of Mothering: Psychoanalysis and the Sociology of Gender [Berkeley: U of California P, 1978]; and Sarah Ruddick, Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace [New York: Ballantine, 1989]), I do not want to overlook the ways maternalism can exploit others (or the Other).
This is a most peculiar wet dream, the life-denying nightmare of a black male child horrified by the prospect of being nurtured to death by a protective, pacifying maternalism.
It is the discourse of maternalism, which traditionally has been the discourse of devotion and dedication in which women turn away from their own needs.
They consider women with political careers, including their legislative careers and recruitment in Britain, challenges faced by legislators who are or will become mothers with infants while in office, maternalism in Latin American politics, the impact of gender quotas on local boards and committees in Iowa, and the construction of motherhood by leaders of national conservative organizations representing womenAEs interests.
In her analysis, for example, Bonifacio often refers to the strong sense of maternalism in Filipino culture that motivates women's decision to immigrate, and explores what effects values such as utang na loob ("debt of gratitude") have on Filipino women's interactions.
These arguments resonated with the rhetoric of early-twentieth century reformers but feminist advocacy for the PDA differed ideologically from earlier maternalism.
She suggests that this organic fusion of identities and affiliations was largely a product of the congruence of suffrage, birth control, and peace work with an ideology of maternalism that motivated many Jewish activists.
Jacobs, White Mother to a Dark Race: Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011).
In chapter 4, Sasha Turner delves into the self-interested maternalism that inspired widow Martha Bowen to run her family's sugar plantation in Jamaica after formal emancipation.

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