maternal

(redirected from maternalistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

maternal

[mə′tərn·əl]
(biology)
Of, pertaining to, or related to a mother.
References in periodicals archive ?
To understand how a maternalistic framework may be useful here, it is helpful to look at maternalism as it contrasts with paternalism.
2) elaborates a sophisticated critique of social capital, noting a distinction between the maternalistic nature of women's organizations, building capital for others, and the fraternal nature of men's organizations, building capital for themselves.
A maternalistic strategy is not new, and has been criticised for celebrating self-sacrifice as an essential feminine attribute, and therefore reinforcing traditional gender roles.
The author also tended to describe this God in maternalistic terms, making Him a substitute for the mother Tolstoy lost when he was about two years old.
experience through his maternalistic relations with the "ample,
She is poised to win the contest, mentoring her remaining acts - hot favourite Rhydian and dark horse Leon - with maternalistic steel.
With paternalism, men are viewed as needing to protect and provide for women who are expected to uphold conventional roles including a maternalistic view of nurturing men's emotional and domestic needs.
Although Boggie articulates, at best, a maternalistic relationship with black women, sometimes the text's informants and contributors expose the shared suffering of black and white women, the commodification of both wives and servants, and the active participation of black women in the resistance movement.
This is a position held by the Government and the medical profession in order to ensure that women are upholding their maternalistic responsibility to society (Summers 1994).
That is to say, the valley is womb-like in both its preceding of civilization and its maternalistic nurturing of what will eventually become a speaking subject operating in the sphere of the symbolic--in this case, the ten stories of women tricking men in Day VII.
Instead she carefully outlines both the personal sacrifices and trials Kingsley-Strack endured in resisting the Board's control of her servants, and her maternalistic and often patronising attitude to Aboriginal people--an attitude which was most challenged in her relationship with Pearl Gibbs but was often reinforced during her dealings with white women's reform groups.
Everything we get of him, we get through Jess's maternalistic crusade to provide Johnny with a family to replace the one he has lost.