Maté

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maté

(mätā`, mătā`),

yerba maté

(yĕr`bä, –bə), or

Paraguay tea,

evergreen tree (Ilex paraguariensis) of the family Aquifoliaceae (hollyholly,
common name for members of the Aquifoliaceae, a family of widely distributed trees and shrubs, most numerous in Central and South America. The evergreen English holly (Ilex aquifolium
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 family). From ancient times Native Americans and now millions of Argentines and others in South America have made a tea (also called maté) from the young leaves and tender shoots of Ilex paraguensis, the source of the best brew, and from closely related species. Mate is the most popular beverage in S South America, and its culture is an important industry in Brazil and Paraguay. The tea is a stimulant and restorative, less astringent than genuine tea, and contains considerable caffeine. The word mate refers also to the cups in which the tea is infused, which are made from curiously shaped gourds or calabashes, with small openings cut in the top and sometimes decorated with silver mountings. The dried leaves are put in a container and covered with boiling water, and the tea is drunk through a bombilla, a tube provided at the lower end with a strainer of fine basketwork, metal, or perforated wood. Mate is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Celastrales.

Maté

 

the dried ground leaves of the evergreen tree Ilex paraguariensis. The tree itself is also called maté. Maté contains up to 1.8 percent caffeine, 0.05 percent theobromine, 9-12 percent tannins, essential oil, vitamins A, B, and C, and citric acid. It is used to prepare a tonic beverage used in South America as tea, which is drunk from a small vessel made from the fruit of a gourd, which is also called maté.


Maté

 

(Ilex paraguariensis), also yerba, a plant of the family Aquifoliaceae. The maté is an evergreen tree measuring 6–16 m tall. The opposite, obovate, and smooth leaves have crenate edges; they are 7–10 cm long and 4–5 cm across. The small, unisexual flowers are usually four-parted and gathered into axillary umbellate inflorescences. The maté most commonly is dioecious, although occasionally monoecious specimens with bisexual flowers are encountered. The fruit is a drupe with four to eight seeds.

The maté grows wild in South America, between 12° and 33° S lat. It is found at elevations of 500 to 900 m above sea level. The plant formerly grew in thickets, most of which have been destroyed. It is cultivated for its leaves and young shoots, which are used to prepare a tonic, also called maté. The plant is cultivated mainly in Brazil and bordering regions of Argentina and Paraguay. Annual production is about 200,000 tons.

REFERENCE

Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.

mate

[māt]
(biology)
To pair for breeding.
To copulate.

mate

1. the sexual partner of an animal
2. Nautical
a. short for first mate
b. any officer below the master on a commercial ship
c. a warrant officer's assistant on a ship
References in classic literature ?
I would get the second mate to relieve me at that hour.
Goodness only knew how that absurdly whiskered mate would "account" for my conduct, and what the whole ship thought of that informality of their new captain.
This time we shall make sure of one scoundrel--sure that he will never again harm us or another," and with a sudden wrench he twisted the neck of the perfidious mate until there was a sharp crack, and the man's body lay limp and motionless in the ape-man's grasp.
The she- wolf sat down in the snow, and old One Eye, now more in fear of his mate than of the mysterious sapling, again sprang for the rabbit.
Mate says we must be past Straits of Dover, as in a moment of fog lifting he saw North Foreland, just as he heard the man cry out.
They no blamed the mate for ut, but me, an' me ashore ot the time on shup's buzz'ness.
And the mate danced up and down upon the cabin top and yelled, "Yah
Instantly both he and his mate leaped for the long neck of the ruminant.
The mate who, on account of his peculiar build, could not turn his head freely, twisted his thick trunk slightly, and ran his black eyes in the corners towards the steward.
I found the poor men on board almost in a tumult to get the victuals out of the boiler before it was ready; but my mate observed his orders, and kept a good guard at the cook-room door, and the man he placed there, after using all possible persuasion to have patience, kept them off by force; however, he caused some biscuit-cakes to be dipped in the pot, and softened with the liquor of the meat, which they called brewis, and gave them every one some to stay their stomachs, and told them it was for their own safety that he was obliged to give them but little at a time.
That isn't just a dog," was Van Horn's conclusion to the mate.
And here, sure enough, is my mate Bill, with a spy-glass under his arm, bless his old 'art, to be sure.