mature

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mature

1. Biology
a. fully developed or differentiated
b. fully grown; adult
2. (of a river valley or land surface) in the middle stage of the cycle of erosion, characterized by meanders, maximum relief, etc.

mature

[mə′chu̇r]
(biology)
Being fully grown and developed.
Ripe.
(food engineering)
Having attained the final state of processing, as certain wines.
(geology)
Pertaining to a topography or region, and to its landforms, having undergone maximum development and accentuation of form.
Pertaining to the third stage of textural maturity of a clastic sediment.
(psychology)
Having the emotional qualities of a well-adjusted adult.
References in classic literature ?
To begin with, many instincts mature gradually, and while they are immature an animal may act in a fumbling manner which is very difficult to distinguish from learning.
Except,' Eugene strikes in: so unexpectedly that the mature young lady, who has forgotten all about him, with a start takes the epaulette out of his way: 'except our friend who long lived on rice- pudding and isinglass, till at length to his something or other, his physician said something else, and a leg of mutton somehow ended in daygo.
The gloomy Eugene too, is not without some kindred touch; for, when that appalling Lady Tippins declares that if Another had survived, he should have gone down at the head of her list of lovers--and also when the mature young lady shrugs her epaulettes, and laughs at some private and confidential comment from the mature young gentleman--his gloom deepens to that degree that he trifles quite ferociously with his dessert-knife.
It has already been casually remarked that certain organs in the individual, which when mature become widely different and serve for different purposes, are in the embryo exactly alike.
In some cases, however, the mature animal is generally considered as lower in the scale than the larva, as with certain parasitic crustaceans.
How, then, can we explain these several facts in embryology,--namely the very general, but not universal difference in structure between the embryo and the adult;--of parts in the same individual embryo, which ultimately become very unlike and serve for diverse purposes, being at this early period of growth alike;--of embryos of different species within the same class, generally, but not universally, resembling each other;--of the structure of the embryo not being closely related to its conditions of existence, except when the embryo becomes at any period of life active and has to provide for itself;--of the embryo apparently having sometimes a higher organisation than the mature animal, into which it is developed.
That they were individually interested in the public liberty and prosperity, and therefore that it was not less their inclination than their duty to recommend only such measures as, after the most mature deliberation, they really thought prudent and advisable.
And because I observed, besides, that an inquiry of this kind was of all others of the greatest moment, and one in which precipitancy and anticipation in judgment were most to be dreaded, I thought that I ought not to approach it till I had reached a more mature age (being at that time but twenty-three), and had first of all employed much of my time in preparation for the work, as well by eradicating from my mind all the erroneous opinions I had up to that moment accepted, as by amassing variety of experience to afford materials for my reasonings, and by continually exercising myself in my chosen method with a view to increased skill in its application.
Chaucer's third period, covering his last fifteen years, is called his English period, because now at last his genius, mature and self-sufficient, worked in essential independence.
His wide experience of men and things is manifest in the life-likeness and mature power of his poetry, and it accounts in part for the broad truth of all but his earliest work, which makes it essentially poetry not of an age but for all time.
The thorough knowledge and sure portrayal of men and women which, belong to his mature work extend through, many various types of character.
Luckily, people, whether mature or not mature (and who really is ever mature?