matzo

(redirected from matzot)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to matzot: matzah, Charoset

matzo

, matzoh, matza, matzah
a brittle very thin biscuit of unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during Passover

Matzo

 

(Unleavened Bread) thin wafer of unleavened dough; Jews eat matzos during Passover instead of leavened bread, which is prohibited at that time.

References in periodicals archive ?
Levine gathered the matzot, slid them into a 650-degree pizza oven and flipped them halfway through their seven-minute baking time with an expertise that came from having flipped hundreds of the flat cakes in the past two weeks.
In the weeks leading up to Passover, which will begin April 11, Levine gives his lesson and flips his matzot to help students understand the ancient reason behind their modern practices.
Most often people purchase Passover matzot rather than making them, so the hands-on experience of making the unleavened bread reinforces the religious and historical lesson, said Karen Persichetti, whose 5-year-old daughter, Sarah, rolled a matzo Monday.
The children remember the experience better because they made the matzot themselves, said Lesley Friedman, a teacher at Adat Elohim.
But there was no canceling the verdict that Jews had a practice of using Christian blood in matzot.
The Israelis are not explicitly accused in the European press of using the blood of the alleged victims for baking matzot, although the lie or paranoid delusion of Jewish ritual murder is common in Arab intellectual life, and it is the explicit theme of writings by none other than the Syrian minister of defense.
If THEY sold matzot in the stores the way it was before the war, we wouldn't have to shlep all the way to the other side of the city.
As it turns out, matzot aren't just sold; they are exchanged for flour.
The baker stores the ready matzot in a carton once used for macaroni.
His lively eyes shining, the baker picks up a still-warm sheet of matzot from the macaroni box, offers it to me and says warmly and simply:
Offering the pieces of matzot it was as if the baker said -- you and I are Jews, a single family.
Still frowning, I take the matzot from the baker's hand.