mean sea level

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mean sea level

[′mēn ′sē ‚lev·əl]
(oceanography)
The average sea surface level for all stages of the tide over a 19-year period, usually determined from hourly height readings from a fixed reference level.

mean sea level

The average height of the surface of the sea for all stages of the tide. It is used as a reference for elevations. Usually, it is determined by averaging the height readings observed hourly over a minimum period of nineteen years. Also called sea-level datum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nearcontinuous data sets of mean sea level values are available since 1842.
As a result of the global sea level rise, the Kronstadt zero is not the present-time mean sea level of this tide gauge.
Thereby, the mean sea level and maximum sea level for Estonia were calculated as the mean for four stations (Parnu, Narva-Joesuu, Rohukula, Ristna) during 1950-2011.
Moving averages of annual mean sea level series show some quasi-periodic 30-50-year cycles, which roughly coincide with similar decadal variations at the Lithuanian (Dailidiene et al.
Corrected with local uplift rates, the mean sea level rise rates in Estonia (Figs 4, 7) seem to be roughly equal to or insignificantly higher than the global tide-gauge-based estimates for the second half of the 20th century: 1.
2006a), the most crucial impact on both the maxima and mean sea level regimes mainly originate from the increase in storminess, and particularly from winter storminess.
The mean sea level and maximum sea level data for Estonia were obtained by averaging the measured values at four stations: Parnu, Narva-Joesuu, Rohukula and Ristna during 1950-2011.
1] sustained wind speed, the direction of SW and the Baltic mean sea level of 70 cm, the maximum sea level may reach 310 cm at Parnu.
Monthly maximum sea levels have generally lower correlations with the variables of atmospheric circulation than the mean sea level data in Table 5.
While mean sea level closely correlates with both atmospheric circulation indices (Table 5) and storminess (Table 3), the high sea level events have particularly close relationships with storminess (Table 3).
The stations with a higher land uplift in northwesternmost Estonia (Ristna, Paldiski) have negative trends in mean sea level, while the stations with a lower land uplift have no trends or even have positive trends (Narva-Joesuu, Parnu).
1: The percentages of missing data and mean sea level rise rate in mm/yr at each station in the GoT in the period 2001-2010.