mean temperature


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mean temperature

[′mēn ′tem·prə·chər]
(meteorology)
The average temperature of the air as indicated by a properly exposed thermometer during a given time period, usually a day, month, or year.
References in periodicals archive ?
While their calculations show an atmosphere containing 6 percent carbon dioxide could have done the trick by keeping the mean temperatures at 57 degrees F, geological evidence from ancient soils on early Earth indicate such high concentrations of CO2 were not present at the time.
So far this summer, mean temperatures for the UK are higher than they were at this point in 2003, the joint warmest summer on record (together with 1976).
At the mean temperature for their respective aquifers, the Alaskan population turned 16.
The second hottest month on record was August 2000, with a mean temperature of 35.
During that time, the mean temperature of the coldest month was about 5[degrees]C warmer than it is today.
According to the Met office the mean temperature was 2.
6[degree]F "was not the overall mean temperature, the mean temperature of any of the time periods studied, the median temperature, or the single most frequent temperature recorded.
A heating degree-day is a unit used in estimating quantities of fuel or power consumption, based on a daily ratio of consumption and the mean temperature below 65 degrees Fahrenheit.
He said: "What it shows is that between the two periods, there has been a half degree Celsius increase in the mean temperature and approximately a 5% increase in annual rainfall across the country.
As the University's records began in 1990, they used Met office findings, to find that the mean temperature was 2.
The Civil Aviation Affairs (CAA) Meteorological Directorate said the mean temperature for the month was 35.
Though the mean temperature at Triton's surface is a firgid-235[degrees]C, dust devils might arise if the sun created a relatively hot spot on Triton's surface.