mean terms

mean terms

[′mēn ′tərmz]
(mathematics)
The second and third terms of a proportion.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It told us, in no mean terms, about the marvels of nature and the limitless universe.
It's become the norm now for successful bands to come out of Wales, so hopefully that will mean terms like 'Cool Cymru' will never be used again.
To my surprise I was nearly "jumped on" by someone who told me in no mean terms that I wasn't allowed to walk around the reservoir and if I did, I was liable to prosecution.
I don't mean terms like paradigm shift, total quality management or lean.
Spink, Jansen, Wolfram, and Saracevic (2002) reported the mean terms per query had increased slightly to 2.
The role of causal principles is also considered in the contributions of later thinkers: the mathematical ones in Iamblichus; those in Proclus (The Elements) such as the Law of Mean Terms, the greater nature of a productive cause vis-a-vis its effect, the need for a single primary efficient cause, and the restriction of causal efficacy to immaterial powers; in Philoponus, the rejection of the heavenly-earthly matter distinction and new ideas about moving bodies and projectile motion; and finally, paradigmatic causes in Simplicius.
And manager Frank Burrows spelled out that warning in no mean terms as he kept his players locked in the dressing room for well over half-an-hour afterwards.