mean

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mean,

in statistics, a type of averageaverage,
number used to represent or characterize a group of numbers. The most common type of average is the arithmetic mean. See median; mode.
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. The arithmetic mean of a group of numbers is found by dividing their sum by the number of members in the group; e.g., the sum of the seven numbers 4, 5, 6, 9, 13, 14, and 19 is 70 so their mean is 70 divided by 7, or 10. Less often used is the geometric mean (for two quantities, the square root of their product; for n quantities, the nth root of their product).

mean

see MEASURES OF CENTRAL TENDENCY.

mean

[mēn]
(mathematics)
A single number that typifies a set of numbers, such as the arithmetic mean, the geometric mean, or the expected value. Also known as mean value.

mean

Maths
a. the second and third terms of a proportion, as b and c in a/b = c/d
b. another name for average See also geometric mean

MEAN

(MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, Node.js) A set of system software used for developing JavaScript-based Web applications. Node.js is server-side JavaScript, while Express provides an abbreviated framework for it. AngularJS is used for client-side JavaScript, and MongoDB is a highly scalable database that supports full clustering and automatic sharding. See MongoDB, Node.js, LAMP and database partitioning.
References in classic literature ?
Therefore it is wiser to have a reputation for meanness which brings reproach without hatred, than to be compelled through seeking a reputation for liberality to incur a name for rapacity which begets reproach with hatred.
Donnithorne himself, for that gentleman had the meanness to receive his own rents and make bargains about his own timber.
Reuter thinks her meanness in eaves-dropping is screened by her art in devising a pretext, whereas the muslin curtains she speaks of are not more transparent than this same pretext.
Oh the utter meanness of such a motive, to be put before men who do know what self-sacrifice is, who can appreciate generosity and heroism
We shall probably see much to wish altered in her, and must prepare ourselves for gross ignorance, some meanness of opinions, and very distressing vulgarity of manner; but these are not incurable faults; nor, I trust, can they be dangerous for her associates.
Memoires de D'Aubigny,' in which that devoted servant, a Gascon like myself, poor as myself, and, I was going to add, brave as myself, relates instances of the meanness of Henry IV.
But this superadded consciousness, wearying and annoying enough when it urged on me the trivial experience of indifferent people, became an intense pain and grief when it seemed to be opening to me the souls of those who were in a close relation to me--when the rational talk, the graceful attentions, the wittily-turned phrases, and the kindly deeds, which used to make the web of their characters, were seen as if thrust asunder by a microscopic vision, that showed all the intermediate frivolities, all the suppressed egoism, all the struggling chaos of puerilities, meanness, vague capricious memories, and indolent make-shift thoughts, from which human words and deeds emerge like leaflets covering a fermenting heap.
Not even an echo answered me; but all of a sudden a small flame flickered descending from the upper darkness and Therese appeared on the first floor landing carrying a lighted candle in front of a livid, hard face, closed against remorse, compassion, or mercy by the meanness of her righteousness and of her rapacious instincts.
And oh, these wise, clever days when we know that money is the only prize worth striving for, when we believe in nothing else but meanness and lies, when we care for no living creature but ourselves!
He is a gentleman of strict conscience, disdainful of all littleness and meanness and ready on the shortest notice to die any death you may please to mention rather than give occasion for the least impeachment of his integrity.
Now the power of election and censure are of the utmost consequence, and this, as has been said, in some states they entrust to the people; for the general assembly is the supreme court of all, and they have a voice in this, and deliberate in all public affairs, and try all causes, without any objection to the meanness of their circumstances, and at any age: but their treasurers, generals, and other great officers of state are taken from men of great fortune and worth.
His heart warms to him when he can bring forward some example of cruelty or meanness, and he exults like an inquisitor at the