meatus

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meatus

[mē′ād·əs]
(anatomy)
A natural opening or passage in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 55 patients who received complete two-stage hypospadias repair, 13 had single urethrocutaneous fistula, 4 had multiple urethrocutaneous fistula, two patients had meatal stenosis, one patient had urethral stricture and one patient had wide meatal opening.
Catheter care should consist of good personal hygiene around the meatal area.
Surgeons should be among the multiple sources of case notification and should be consulted for verification of case status and meatal location for all cases.
Intra-operatively, these bony swellings were found to be a solid bony mass under the meatal skin, extending down to the level of the annulus.
In clinical trials, local adverse events leading to discontinuation or dose interruption included: application site reactions, phimosis, inguinal lymphadenitis, urethral meatal stenosis, dysuria, genital herpes simplex, vulvitis, hypersensitivity, pruritis, pyodermitis, skin ulcer, erosions in the urethral meatus, and superinfection of warts and ulcers.
Examination of the nasal cavity indicated slight deviation of the nasal septum to the right and general swelling and bulging of the left middle meatal region.
At the time of surgery, the right middle meatal polypoid mass was seen to be originating in the right frontal recess and was carefully resected with a microdebrider at its superior base in the frontal recess (figure 1, D).
We considered proximal hypospadias as all cases whose meatal location ranged from the proximal shaft of the penis to the perineum.
58) Meatal stenosis affects 5-10% of circumcised infant males.
In clinical trials, the incidence of local adverse events leading to discontinuation or dose interruption included: application site reactions (local pain, erythema, vesicles, skin erosion/ulceration), phimosis, inguinal lymphadenitis, urethral meatal stenosis, dysuria, genital herpes simples, vulvitis, hypersensitivity, pruritus, pyodermitis, skin ulcer, erosions in the urethral meatus, and superinfection of warts and ulcers.
1%) of our patients had meatal stenosis and were treated with meatoplasty.