mechanical hysteresis

mechanical hysteresis

[mi′kan·ə·kəl ‚his·tə′rē·səs]
(mechanics)
The dependence of the strain of a material not only on the instantaneous value of the stress but also on the previous history of the stress; for example, the elongation is less at a given value of tension when the tension is increasing than when it is decreasing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of an LVDT for probe shaft displacement sensing eliminates any additional transducer errors due to friction, stiction or mechanical hysteresis.
Mechanical hysteresis tests were also performed at different maximum stress levels of 1.
This makes it very difficult to separate long-term mechanical hysteresis drift from thermal gradient signals.
Much of the work on mechanical hysteresis was based on earlier work carried out by P.
Note that the underlying non-linear drift is due to mechanical hysteresis, and is probably the result of temperature gradients.
During the strain cycle, energy is absorbed by mechanical hysteresis.
Although van Wyk's theory is considered to be the most realistic, many authors have pointed out in their articles the weakness of the theory since it does not explain the irrecoverable strain during initial compression and the mechanical hysteresis when the fiber mass is subjected to compression-release cycling.
Van Wyk's theory, although developed for wool wads with randomly oriented fibers and despite of generally accepted fact that it does not explain mechanical hysteresis during compression-release cycling, seems to be applicable for fitting not only the compression curve of fabric but also for the release curve of fabric during compression cycling.
For all materials, even in a continuous and homogeneous cyclic loading-unloading process, there is typically a difference between deforming work and elastic recovery, which is the mechanical hysteresis.
Prior to the study of dissipation, cyclic mechanical tests were performed on the rubber belts to observe the amount of mechanical hysteresis.

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