shift

(redirected from mediastinal shift)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to mediastinal shift: mediastinum, flail chest, mediastinal flutter, Tension pneumothorax

shift

the displacement of rocks, esp layers or seams in mining, at a geological fault

shift

[shift]
(computer science)
A movement of data to the right or left, in a digital-computer location, usually with the loss of characters shifted beyond a boundary.
(geology)
The relative displacement of the units affected by a fault but outside the fault zone itself.
(industrial engineering)
The number of hours or the part of any day worked. Also known as tour.
(mechanical engineering)
To change the ratio of the driving to the driven gears to obtain the desired rotational speed or to avoid overloading and stalling an engine or a motor.
(metallurgy)
A casting defect caused by malalignment of the mold parts.
(spectroscopy)
A small change in the position of a spectral line that is due to a corresponding change in frequency which, in turn, results from one or more of several causes, such as the Doppler effect.

SHIFT

Scalable Heterogeneous Integrated Facility Testbed. A parallel processing project at CERN.
References in periodicals archive ?
By postoperative day 9, the left side had become hyperinflated, which resulted in a right mediastinal shift (figure 1).
The chest CT was done in the arterial phase and showed a hypoplastic right upper lobe bronchus and consequently also a hypoplastic right lung - this explained the mediastinal shift to the right (Fig.
A portable anteroposterior chest radiograph showed volume loss in the right lung with mediastinal shift toward the right.
Expiratory films may improve diagnosis of bronchial foreign bodies by visualising air trapping and/or mediastinal shift, if there is partial obstruction of the bronchial lumen on expiration creating a ball-valve like effect (5).
During physical examination of the chest, inspection often reveals decreased chest wall expansion, use of accessory muscles of ventilation, and, depending on the size of the atelectatic area, tracheal and mediastinal shift toward the affected region.