medication


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medication

1. treatment with drugs or remedies
2. a drug or remedy

medication

[‚med·ə′kā·shən]
(medicine)
A medicinal substance.
Treatment by or administration of a medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this study didn't focus specifically on high-cost drugs, the majority of specialty drugs treat chronic illness, with most members on multiple medications.
That decision is difficult because each schizophrenia medication has different effects, she notes.
Dispensing -- Did the pharmacy provide the right medication to the right clinical unit?
The analysts comment that primary health care expenditures on individuals with HIV infection "are, paradoxically, both decreased by and driven by the use of antiretroviral medications.
If that doesn't control your exercise-induced asthma, you may need preventative medications such as inhaled corticosteroids.
I've reviewed news coverage of mood medication since the early 1990s, and Shermer's caveats describe perfectly their heady mix of personal success stories, accounts of scientific breakthroughs, and hyperbolic language of personal, social, and cultural transformation.
These medications should be taken with food to minimize side effects.
We preach to these patients to take the medication and to have control,'' the pharmacist said.
Being able to eliminate one medication completely would allow you to take a more rational approach to determining which agent is causing your problem.
These changes revised the medication error definition by increasing the focus on appropriate drug delivery technique; assessing medication use through 5 of 24 quality indicators; and expanding the list of medications considered potentially inappropriate for the elderly resident.
Most do best with combined treatment: medication to gain relatively quick symptom relief and psychotherapy to learn more effective ways to deal with life's problems, including depression.
The rate of tardive dyskinesia among patients treated with traditional antipsychotics for more than one year is at least 10% (Kane, Woerner, & Borenstein, 1986), and the cumulative risk is estimated to increase 5% each year the medication is taken (Dawkins et al.