medieval

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medieval

, mediaeval
of, relating to, or in the style of the Middle Ages
References in periodicals archive ?
She structures her exploration of multiplicitous, plastic, and unstable temporalities around the figure of the amateur medievalist of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and defines their amateurism not on the basis of being paid or unpaid, but on their "affections, their intimacy with their materials, their desires," explaining that the amateurs' "operation" outside the "culture of professionalism" opens them to experience temporal connections in ways foreclosed to the professional--thus necessarily detached and objective--academician (29, 25).
Note that the burden of this transformation is here named as falling especially on medievalists, despite the fact that, as Wallace mentions, "most of the new initiatives in medieval and Renaissance studies" have "been made by medievalists reading forwards rather than by Renaissance scholars reading back" (220).
That is why those medievalists were so important: the nature of their specialism meant that they assumed students needed some mastery of other disciplines.
Gaunt begins with the point (familiar to medievalists, but worth reiterating for others) that the boundary between sacred and profane is so permeable as to be non-existent in the medieval period and goes on to argue for a figuration of love as sacrifice that is purely ethical rather than religious.
Her reading of Lacan's seventh seminar on ethics, that which contains his major discussion of courtly love and which has been the prime focus for medievalists interested in Lacan, is expanded in chapter 3.
There is enough detail in most of the essays to satisfy specialists, while few medievalists are so accomplished as not to benefit from this collection of wide-ranging studies covering ceremonial affairs at the papal court, the council of Nidaros and Scandinavian diplomacy, the role of Adrian in the promotion of St.
If the examples she provides us with regarding wonder in the Middle Ages and what made for wonder, regarding metamorphosis or what made for change in the Middle Ages, regarding hybrids or what made for combined forms in the Middle Ages, or regarding shape or what made for structure and the narrative of it in the Middle Ages are any indication, we medievalists will be wrestling with these debates and views many years into the future.
The introduction is by David Trotter, who polemically takes to task monoglot medievalists (particularly scholars of multilingualism and literary theorists): 'The present volume shows only too clearly that medievalists cannot be permitted simply not to bother with "difficult languages", still less to remain monoglot' (p.
Though Holsinger explains his idiosyncratic protocol in an opening note, medievalists who are used to stricter handling of critical apparatus may wonder at both the variety of presentation and the un documented extent of his "silent alteration" of published translations, especially when it seems that he is certainly capable of doing his own.
The conclusions the author draws from his limited documentary base are sure to elicit strong responses from medievalists.
Like most medievalists, he assumed, of course, that had this miracle of time travel occurred, he would have surely been a part of the astonishingly powerful yet small medieval aristocracy (or its ideological agents in the Church) rather than a part of the peasantry.
Each of these writers interprets courtly love in ways often fundamentally different from the others (and medievalists regard Lewis' Allegory of Love with diminishing veneration) but the disagreements of these 20th century scholars have little to do with the ways Twain and Adams understood courtly love.