medusa

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medusa,

in zoology, scientific name for the jellyfishjellyfish,
common name for the free-swimming stage (see polyp and medusa), of certain invertebrate animals of the phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). The body of a jellyfish is shaped like a bell or umbrella, with a clear, jellylike material filling most of the space between
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, i.e., the free-swimming stage of various animals in the phylum CnidariaCnidaria
or Coelenterata
, phylum of invertebrate animals comprising the sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids. Cnidarians are radially symmetrical (see symmetry, biological).
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. See polyp and medusapolyp and medusa,
names for the two body forms, one nonmotile and one typically free swimming, found in the aquatic invertebrate phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). Some animals of this group are always polyps, some are always medusae, and some exhibit both a polyp and a medusa
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.

Medusa

(mədo͞o`sə), in Greek mythology, most famous of the three monstrous GorgonGorgon
, in Greek mythology, one of three monstrous sisters, Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa; daughters of Ceto and Phorcus. Their hair was a cluster of writhing snakes, and their faces were so hideous that all who saw them were turned to stone. Only Medusa was mortal.
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 sisters. She was once a beautiful woman, but she offended Athena, who changed her hair into snakes and made her face so hideous that all who looked at her were turned to stone. When Medusa was with child by Poseidon, Perseus killed her and presented her head to Athena. Chrysaor and Pegasus sprang from her blood when she died. Medusa's head retained its petrifying power even after her death. Because of this power, her image frequently appeared on Greek armor. In some myths Athena used the Medusa head on her aegis.

Medusa

In Greek mythology, the mortal one of the three Gorgons, who had snakes for hair and whose head was cut off by Perseus to present to Athena as an ornament for her shield.

Medusa

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Medusa, asteroid 149 (the 149th asteroid to be discovered, on September 21, 1875), is approximately 26 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.2 years. Medusa was named after the famous Greek woman whose visage could turn men into stone. J. Lee Lehman associates this asteroid with “volcanic” temperaments, although she adds that in small doses, it may add spice to one’s character. Jacob Schwartz gives the astrological significance of Medusa as “the triumph of patriarchal forces over the matriarchal Gorgon Amazons of Lake Triton, or the slaying by Perseus, representing a naval triumph over the Gorgon rulers of the three main Azores islands, thus women of deadly abilities.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Medusa

 

in ancient Greek mythology, one of the three Gorgons, winged monsters whose glance turned living beings into stone. Perseus, the hero of the Argos tales, overcame Medusa with the aid of the gods and presented her severed head to Athena, who fastened it to her shield, the aegis.

medusa

[mə′düs·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)

Medusa

beheaded by Perseus. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 206; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]

Medusa

the only mortal Gorgon. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 161]

Medusa

her face was so hideous that any who saw it were turned to stone. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 596]

Medusa

creature with fangs, snake-hair, and protruding tongue. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 206]

medusa

1. another name for jellyfish
2. one of the two forms in which a coelenterate exists. It has a jelly-like umbrella-shaped body, is free swimming, and produces gametes
References in periodicals archive ?
Carter mockingly deconstructs the machinations of the surgeon Mother of Beulah in The Passion of New Eve, with her Medusan "hair like a nest of petrified snakes" (190).
In contrast to Petrarch, who presents himself as a Medusan victim or as one transformed, Magny consistently follows the example of Ovid to depict himself as a triumphant Medusan agent or transforming Perseus.
His mouth, prime feature of his Medusan manhood, equates effeminate males (Westervelt being "foppish") with artificiality, the physical blight of moral depravity and "contagion.
The centenary of the Revolution in 1889 generated a further crop of republican celebrations and antirepublican caricatures; one of the latter portrayed 'la republique meurtriere entre l'incendie et la guillotine' in unambiguously Medusan terms: 'la torche d'une main, le poignard de l'autre, la tete couronnee de serpents, vetue d'une robe illustree de tetes de morts, foulant aux pieds la Croix et l'Evangile, la tiare et la couronne royale' (Giraud, 1984: 96).
The Body of Death: Medusan Transfigurations of Betweenness in Keats and Swinburne.
And the more specifically and radically woman-focused (and the more overtly accusatory of men) the other's narratives are, the more keenly they are perceived as Medusan.
Medusan morphospace: phylogenetic constraints, biomechanical solutions, and ecological consequences.
Emin trades in the flowery phrases found in ladies' heirloom handiwork for turbo-charged, Medusan rage directed at all the guys who've done her wrong.
Readers of Livy and Tacitus did not necessarily identify history with the defence of hereditary rule, Foxe was certainly not a feminist, yet the Acts and Monuments, and dramatic adaptations from it, include many prominent godly women, seen as fellow-strugglers rather then a Medusan Other.
As for the slicing of the eye in the film, the word venda (|bandage' or |blindfold'), which is soon set in the context of wearing a blindfold, nonetheless begins by releasing the suggestion of a bandaged wound or injury, especially if we keep in mind the Medusan expressions - of the night sentry, who on the belfry without bells had his bayonet stuck into the moon' (:59, my translation), and The night sentry on his tower has pulled his bayonet out of the moon' :351, my translation) - that are to be read, the former towards the end of the first part of the novel, and the latter only two or three pages before the present passage.
the comedian/actress/singer once described by a critic as "a pathetic neutered Barbie doll with a frightening Medusa head" (and by another as a "terrorist lap dancer") struts the stage of a dingy West Village theater wearing a transparent Isaac Mizrahi dress over a black lace G-string; her hair is a wild, vaguely Medusan tangle, and she is fully sexually charged - not the least bit pathetic - as she riffs, with her customary scattershot brilliance, on our garbage culture.
Freeze-fracture and histofluo-rescence studies on photoreceptive membranes of medusan ocelli.