megalomania


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megalomania

a mental illness characterized by delusions of grandeur, power, wealth, etc.

megalomania

[‚meg·ə·lō′mā·nē·ə]
(psychology)
The delusion of greatness and omnipotence characterizing certain psychotic reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
He lectured militant Israelis saying, "Part of our megalomania and our loss of proportion is the things that are said here about Iran.
Ask whichever lackey who is reading this to you to sort it out quickly before the ol' megalomania tokes on even firmer grip end you really start believing your own propaganda.
Daniel Day-Lewis delivers a towering BAFTA and Oscar winning performance in the leading role as venal oil baron Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood, the gut-wrenching fable of grasping megalomania in turn-of-the-century California.
Winslow West's megalomania nearly resulted in tragedy because the parents put their children in dangerous situations just to please him.
Armitage Shanks's megalomania continues unchallenged.
WE are once again subjected to Richard Brunstrom's attention-seeking megalomania.
In ``Help Me Help You,'' his megalomania scarcely seems justified, given his own fractured personal life -- his wife (Jane Kaczmarek in a recurring role) has dumped him, and his daughter is working out daddy issues by dating a man Bill's age, a psychology professor working out his own issues of Hoffman worship.
Gene Roddenberry: The Myth and the Man Behind Star Trek, documents him as a hard-drinking TV tyrant who repeatedly rooked his collaborators out of money and credit, manipulated the personal loyalty of the show's fans to insinuate himself with movie and TV players who would have preferred to lock him out of developing Trek projects, and through megalomania and general nuttiness managed to obstruct as much as he created.
The honor among men, the pride of women, the traumata of maladjusted princes, the megalomania of dwarfs, and the inferiority complexes of dragons--so many feminist, psychoanalytical, and pedagogical approaches abound in Duve's novel that even the ladies of the harem know their women's rights and like to smoke funny cigarettes.
Madhouse: A Tragic Tale of Megalomania and Modern Medicine.
Along the way, he plots the progress of Napoleon's megalomania, his plans to invade England, and Nelson's determination to stop him.