megalomania

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megalomania

a mental illness characterized by delusions of grandeur, power, wealth, etc.

megalomania

[‚meg·ə·lō′mā·nē·ə]
(psychology)
The delusion of greatness and omnipotence characterizing certain psychotic reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to Jones' megalomaniacal staging-video cameras and microphones appear to have been ubiquitous-Nelson is able to present an almost cinema verite vision of the Temple, which he supplements with survivors' accounts.
Its megalomaniacal purpose: create a worldwide American empire as part of our nation's "global responsibilities" and begin to "challenge regimes hostile to our interests.
For two weeks, the Championship and Leagues One and Two will have a share of the spotlight before the Premiership, the megalomaniacal big brother, returns to dominate on August 19.
In one city the wealthy live in a skyscraper run by megalomaniacal tycoon, Kaufman (Hopper), while the impoverished scrabble to exist on the streets below.
The bad news is your teachers are terrorized by irrational policies made unilaterally by megalomaniacal network administrators.
In Siegfried Mulisch seeks to solve the lingering problem Hitler holds for humanity through his protagonist, Herter, a character that bears more than a passing resemblance to the affably arrogant Mulisch, who manages to be megalomaniacal and self-effacing at the same time.
Among other traits, in the Rubins' view, he is petty, arrogant, megalomaniacal, and disingenuous.
He sees the incident as enacting nothing less than the birth of the bureaucratic and totalitarian state, embodied in the bellicose and megalomaniacal person of the Sun King himself.
Zimbabwe is the only sub-Saharan nation that is getting significant attention in the West for its oppression of press liberty -- but, then, President Robert Mugabe's megalomaniacal campaign against free expression of any kind is hard to ignore.
ACFE's Bishop asserts that this take-no-prisoners leader bears all the earmarks of a psychopath: among other qualities, he--it will usually be a man--is megalomaniacal, glib and superficial.
In this story, his travels take him from London to Miami to Cuba to Russia and several stops in between as he goes head to head with a megalomaniacal Russian who has a nuclear bomb and a freakishly Frankenstein-ian henchman.
Gier's study is extensive, and it examines a wide-ranging, cosmopolitan assortment of religio-philosophical conceptions of human nature, highlighting the extent to which they convey, or do not convey, an objectionable megalomaniacal quality.