megapode


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megapode

(mĕg`əpōd'), common name for large, stout-bodied, long-tailed, terrestrial, nonmigratory birds comprising six genera in the family Megapodiidae. Members of the family have large, strong feet, hence the name megapode (from the Greek meaning "large foot"). Also called mound birds and incubator birds, they are remarkable in that they do not brood their eggs, but rather deposit them in mounds of earth and leaves and allow them to be incubated by the heat from the sun and from rotting vegetable material. The territory of each male contains a single mound, often the work of generations, reaching up to 15 ft (4.5 m) in height and 50 ft (15.2 m) in diameter. The male remains in the vicinity of the mound throughout the brood season, constantly checking and regulating the temperature by adding or removing material. The megapodes are commonly divided into three groups: the generally dullish-colored jungle fowl of the New Guinea rain forest, the blackish brush turkeys (e.g. Allectura lathami) of coastal Australia, and the reddish-brown, white-spotted Mallee fowl (Leipoa ocellata) of Australia's semiarid scrub region. Many megapode species were early carried by canoe to the South Pacific. Omnivorous, their diet includes insects, small animals, fruit, and seeds. Egg-laying details are well known for the Mallee fowl, which over a period of time in the early spring, deposits from 5 to 35 eggs. The eggs begin to incubate immediately, the heat inside the mound being carefully watched and regulated by the parents. This is accomplished by adding sand to cover the eggs if there is too much heat from the sun, or scratching it away, thereby increasing the amount of heat reaching the eggs. The Mallee fowl usually builds a new mound every year, unlike other members of the family. Megapodes are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Galliformes, family Megapodiidae.

megapode

any ground-living gallinaceous bird of the family Megapodiidae, of Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands. Their eggs incubate in mounds of sand, rotting vegetation, etc., by natural heat
References in periodicals archive ?
Worldwide, there are 22 megapode species, all occurring in the Australo-Pacific region.
Further, many are involved in school fund-raising activities; digging megapode eggs; marketing eggs or fruit in Gizo; and local lineage matters.
DWS and JJK have identified extinct or extirpated species of megapode (Megapodius undescribed sp.
Tenders are invited for Annual Contract For Supply Of Fast Moving Consumer Goods (Fmgc) For Megapode Resort, Camping Resort & Hornbill Nest, Port Blair.
Tenders are invited for Annual Contract For Supply Of Provision Items For Megapode Resort, Camping Resort And Hornbill Nest
Tenders are invited for Providing And Fixing Of Cera Plank And Other Allied Civil Works At Megapode Resort, Port Blair
It's been suggested that the mysterious tumuli were the nests of Sylviornis, which, like its living relatives the megapodes, buried its eggs to be hatched by the warmth of the earth.
32 As their name suggests, the species of birds known as megapodes are characterised by very large what?
Throughout the book there is more than a generous sprinkling of other erroneous information that proves distracting: fishhawks don't mewl, megapodes aren't flightless, Oliver Austin's nickname was Ickky not Iggy, shotguns don't shoot bullets, etc.
I found numerous outright mistakes, the most obvious of which include: long wavy, rather than stiff, tail streamers on the Red-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon rubricauda); black, rather than chestnut, thighs on the Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias); reversal of the illustrations of the two megapodes (Megapodius spp.