megapode


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megapode

(mĕg`əpōd'), common name for large, stout-bodied, long-tailed, terrestrial, nonmigratory birds comprising six genera in the family Megapodiidae. Members of the family have large, strong feet, hence the name megapode (from the Greek meaning "large foot"). Also called mound birds and incubator birds, they are remarkable in that they do not brood their eggs, but rather deposit them in mounds of earth and leaves and allow them to be incubated by the heat from the sun and from rotting vegetable material. The territory of each male contains a single mound, often the work of generations, reaching up to 15 ft (4.5 m) in height and 50 ft (15.2 m) in diameter. The male remains in the vicinity of the mound throughout the brood season, constantly checking and regulating the temperature by adding or removing material. The megapodes are commonly divided into three groups: the generally dullish-colored scrubfowl of the New Guinea rain forest, the blackish brush turkeys (e.g. Allectura lathami) of coastal Australia, and the reddish brown, white-spotted Mallee fowl (Leipoa ocellata) of Australia's semiarid scrub region. Many megapode species were early carried by canoe to the South Pacific. Omnivorous, their diet includes insects, small animals, fruit, and seeds. Egg-laying details are well known for the Mallee fowl, which over a period of time in the early spring, deposits from 5 to 35 eggs. The eggs begin to incubate immediately, the heat inside the mound being carefully watched and regulated by the parents. This is accomplished by adding sand to cover the eggs if there is too much heat from the sun, or scratching it away, thereby increasing the amount of heat reaching the eggs. The Mallee fowl usually builds a new mound every year, unlike other members of the family. Megapodes are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Galliformes, family Megapodiidae.

megapode

any ground-living gallinaceous bird of the family Megapodiidae, of Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands. Their eggs incubate in mounds of sand, rotting vegetation, etc., by natural heat
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Snow Leopard, Bustard (including Floricans), River Dolphin, Hangul, Nilgiri Tahr, Marine Turtles, Dugong & Coral reefs, Edible Nest Swiftlet, Asian Wild Buffalo, Nicobar Megapode, Manipur Brow-antlered Deer, Vultures, Malabar Civet, Indian Rhinoceros, Asiatic Lion, Swamp Deer and Jerdons Courser.
Tenders are invited for Annual Contract For Supply Of Broiler Chicken, Mutton, Egg And Packed Branded Frozen Chicken/Mutton To Megapode Resort.
Tenders are invited for Tender or Annual Contract For Supply Of Provision Items For Megapode Resort Of Aniidco Ltd.
ALONG with tracking rare owls, Joseph also guides walks to find nicobar pigeons (a close relative of the dodo) and intriguingly-named megapodes.
Using a machete to slice through layer-upon-layer of thick ferns and spiralling vines, Joseph clears our path to a thermal lake and hot springs where megapodes incubate eggs in the warm ground.
Paleontologists from Flinders University recently identified five large extinct birds called megapodes that are related to animals that can be found today, including the (http://www.
Altogether, the species greatly add to the number of known megapodes in Australia's prehistoric past.
Bird bones from the To'aga site, Ofu, American Samoa: Prehistoric loss of seabirds and megapodes.
32 As their name suggests, the species of birds known as megapodes are characterised by very large what?
It's been suggested that the mysterious tumuli were the nests of Sylviornis, which, like its living relatives the megapodes, buried its eggs to be hatched by the warmth of the earth.
Bird bones from the To'aga site: prehistoric loss of seabirds and megapodes.
Part 3 focuses on the taxonomic distribution of avian families, showing that of the terrestrial bird fauna it was the rails, megapodes and pigeons which were the most severely effected by prehistoric humans.