Melancholic

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Melancholic

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Melancholic is the traditional name for the personality temperament indicated by an excess of the element earth.

References in periodicals archive ?
As with McRobbie's young women and the loss of feminism, Kelman's men, forced to relinquish this perspective and its critical power in order to become legible in the neoliberal order, are melancholically constituted by their ungrievable loss of radical working-class masculine identity.
In this experience, trauma is not so much understood as it is 'incorporated melancholically.
Her face portrays sadness, as she looks down melancholically at something out of view and avoids eye contact with the camera.
Against tendencies to romanticize nature as real and disappearing quickly or to see it as melancholically beyond our reach, I want to look at the Okanagan that Lane imagines in Red Dog Red Dog and consider how the book offers an immanent theorization of nature as something uncanny and disorganizing rather than something that is either over there outside the window or outside language and knowledge.
Inspired by the Englishman Thomas Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" (1751), Millevoye created the prototypical image of the doomed jeune malade, the young invalid who, "triste, et mourant a son aurore" ("sad, and dying in the dawn of his years"), wanders elegiacally amid an autumnal wood in his 1811 poem "La Chute des Feuilles" ("The Falling of the Leaves"; Millevoye 79X5 Raging against his own mortality, longing for the beloved he cannot now marry, and melancholically contemplating the transience of life, Millevoye's jeune malade is Faust, Werther, and Hamlet by turns.
Write Sussman and Groves, "the discourse must also be budged away from melancholically lingering over wreckage and debris, whose finality forecloses the initiative in advance by staging its own belatedness, a melodrama in which the inertia of political apathy finds its perverse self-justification by the end of every episode, every foretold extinction event, every inundated island community" (16).
There is another scene where Lola's friend Duende (Roberto Sosa) is waiting for her in the street and in a close-up shot the camera focuses on his face--we see the jagged scar that crosses his left cheek--while he melancholically looks down.
This lighthearted moment gradually becomes ironic, as Louis Armstrong melancholically sings "(What Did I Do To Be So) Black and Blue?
His response to this trauma is to form a melancholically ambivalent connection to this planter, both idealizing him and seeking to destroy him by taking his place.
But if the anthropomorphic metaphor of death was operative at all, then it worked not to posit painting as melancholically deceased but to propose the form as a kind of zombie, a dead thing imitating life.
One of the main implications of Mishra's perception of the diasporic imaginary as melancholically fixated on an absence elevated to the status of an unparalleled ideal, is that it leads us to think of diaspora "in terms of negation" (Mishra 16), indeed in terms of losses wholly or partially withdrawn from consciousness.
The notion of self-consciousness as a derivative of mourning is a widespread anthropological cliche in the 18th century, teaching us that man is a specific being, because he can envision or foresee his own future death in the past deaths of others --because he can melancholically (according to a logic of proleptic retrospection) mourn himself in advance.