meltwater


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meltwater

[′melt‚wȯd·ər]
(hydrology)
Water derived from melting ice or snow, especially glacier ice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Farther north meltwater accumulated and drowned ground moraine to form post-glacial lakes that were eventually drained as the drainage network of Mud Brook became better integrated.
By contrast, Condron and Winsor's model shows that when the meltwater first drains into the Arctic Ocean, narrow coastal boundary currents can efficiently deliver it to the deep water formation regions of the sub-polar north Atlantic, weakening the thermohaline circulation by more than 30 percent.
Measurements of the light field under the ice showed that four times as much light penetrated ice covered with meltwater ponds than ice covered with snow.
19) This means snow and glacial melting occurs sooner than it ordinarily would--a concern for populations that rely on meltwater for seasonal water supplies.
Anyone who finds a duck and contacts NASA will be helping the scientists figure out where the meltwater running underneath this particular moulin ends up.
We found clear evidence that supraglacial lakes - the pools of meltwater that form on the surface in summer - can actually drive a crack through the ice sheet," Das said.
In places like the Himalayas [a mountain range in Asia], the summer water supply is 100 percent glacier meltwater," says Fagre.
It said the Arctic climate changes will affect the entire globe through increased heat absorption, rising sea levels and disrupted ocean currents from glacial meltwater.
One 'crazy-but-it-just-might-work' proposal involved shipping iceberg meltwater in huge, floating 'Medusa bags from Greenland (a Danish territory) to Africa to help alleviate water shortages and boost the Greenlandic economy.
N-channels are the product of discrete or consolidated flow; such channels can transport large volumes of sediment-carrying meltwater, commonly as a slurry that can be a potent agency of erosion.
The disappearance of ponded meltwater in the field may not be as accurate an indicator of spring thaw as generations of farmers have believed, say AR-S scientists in the Soil and Water Management Research Unit at St.
As the Pleistocene glacier covering northern New England retreated some 10,000 to 20,000 years ago, meltwater and suspended sand and gravel poured downward from the mile-thick glacier to produce an 80-foot-deep deposit.