memory power

memory power

[′mem·rē ‚pau̇·ər]
(computer science)
A relative characteristic pertaining to differences in access time speeds in different parts of memory; for instance, access time from the buffer may be a tenth of the access time from core.
References in periodicals archive ?
An option for run-time power-down of portions of cache memories, yielding up to 75 percent local memory power savings in select operating scenarios with dynamic cache-way control.
Synopsis: With over 200 well-researched tips and 300 scholarly references, Memory Power 101 is specifically written to help students get better grades, aid professionals in essential confidence building, and give seniors a means of taking control of senility.
Other options of the car are the panoramic sunroof, bigger 8" navigation screen, front and rear parking sensors, premium Infinity sound system, driver integrated memory power seat, auto cruise control and many more.
24 ( ANI ): Researchers have showed that classroom naps support learning in preschool kids by increasing their memory power.
Additionally, the line includes Omega 3 Power, which provides 1,600 mg of omega 3 fatty acids from ultra-purified fish oil; and Brain & Memory Power Boost, which includes N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC), phosphatidylserine, huperzine A and acetyl-l-carnitine, vinpocetine and gingko biloba.
They are NHL sponsors, as well as co-sponsors for motivational speaker, Tom Weber, who will be opening the event Thursday morning with his presentation entitled “Discovering your Memory Power.
They found that rapamycin enhanced learning and memory in young mice and improved memory power in old mice.
He also applies his memory power to his favourite subject, physics.
The conference's other keynote, Scott Bornstein, president of Memory Power for Sales, Performance & Profits also drew rapt attention as he took attendees through a series of hands-on memory exercises to help them improve their memories and therein their sales and business relationships.
Flick through the papers and you'll read that emails harm our ability to distinguish between important and trivial information, and that mobile devices are ruining our memory power.
And if I've remembered correctly, from the age of 20 an average man loses 2% of his memory power per decade.
By using the right techniques though, anyone can boost their memory power.