deception

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Related to mendacity: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

deception

[di′sep·shən]
(electronics)
The deliberate radiation, reradiation, alteration, absorption, or reflection of electromagnetic energy in a manner intended to mislead an enemy in the interpretation of information received by his electronic systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Men of Tortuga and now Perfect Mendacity seem, to use a cliche, to be "ripped from the headlines" pieces.
The list repeated in its headline the absurd mendacity that a "Court Ruled That the Media Can Legally Lie.
Although some of us may pride ourselves that we were never fooled, we still might accept as our civic duty the responsibility to buttress our fellow citizens against the mendacity of our high officials.
In other words, just war as statecraft has yet to articulate an account of right intent that is capable of warding off the charge of cynical mendacity or rank hypocrisy.
This mendacity was a clear and deliberate attempt to hide the source of the donations by the Board President and the Chair of the Curriculum Committee to further ensure that Dover students received a creationist alternative to Darwin's theory of evolution.
The "weasel words" and downright mendacity contained in many public statements from our bishops and from the pulpit should bring shame on all of us.
Louis native who hated the place--and William's theme is mendacity .
Chris Mackey calls the claims of prisoner-celebrities such as Moazzam Begg astonishing in their mendacity,' said Ms MacDonald.
The first half of the book, an adaptation of Alterman's Stanford doctoral dissertation, examines the presidential mendacity in Franklin Roosevelt and John Kennedy.
24) Biting the lip, touching the nose or the back of the neck, jiggling a foot or leg, tugging at ears, or wringing hands often are misunderstood as evincing mendacity when, in fact, these merely reflect the assuagement of tension or nervousness.
Baricco's characters are unable to resign themselves to the awkwardness and mendacity of ordinary life, as the event they both perpetrated has left a film on them, an invisible gauze that is itself both the question and the answer: How does one scrape the film away so that he or she might breathe?
The so-called enlightenment philosopher, the German, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (to cite just one example out of the coterie of enlightened ignoramuses whose mendacity wrought havoc on Africa) expunged Africa from the realm of history by recourse to the same subterfuge--"Africa never had a written tradition and therefore it does not belong to history proper".