mendicant

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mendicant

1. (of a member of a religious order) dependent on alms for sustenance
2. a mendicant friar
References in periodicals archive ?
Between the opening analysis of Aquinas's teaching on mendicancy and the concluding application to current market realities, F.
Although according to conventional wisdom becoming a street beggar signalled an obvious failure in life, I wish to emphasize that mendicancy was nevertheless a job option for the poor.
Mendicancy was thus frequently a method for the urban poor to eke out an existence in the city.
26) Such a dim view of beggars combined with the ubiquity of mendicancy in Shanghai led the creation of a local name for "beggar," a name which soon become common throughout the country.
Finally, a third category of charities was fundamental to the successful enforcement of various laws such as those against mendicancy and delinquency.
On November 22, 1890, for example, Justin de Selves, prefect of the Gironde, convened a Special Commission on Mendicancy, which asked the SEMB to organize a new section for the infirm - "the most deserving category of the disinherited.
Their prolonged presence in the establishment would alter the goal of this institution, and, if it became the rule, would make it impossible for the city to repress mendicancy.
provides a series of intellectually stimulating insights, including his treatment of why religious mendicancy was such a threat to the feudal world; the idea that Aquinas's spirituality rests on the sanctity of intelligence and the holiness of truth; and Aquinas's distinction between the nature of religion, with its highly ramified network of social expectations, and the loving freedom of the contemplative, together with his argument for the "mixed" life as the highest form of devotion to God.
The first example will be that of the so-called Basler Beginenstreit, a prolonged and bitter series of attacks on beguines, including Franciscan tertiaries, directed at the allegedly illicit voluntary poverty and mendicancy practiced by these devout, semireligious lay people.
The point I want to stress here is that, whatever the explicit nature of the accusations and charges brought against beguines at any particular time, the issue of lay poverty and mendicancy, and the profound clerical ambivalence towards these practices, almost always lay at the root of the conflict.
Rather, at the heart of most of the attacks directed against the beguines by ecclesiastical authorities (and often by secular authorities as well) lay concern over and objections to lay religious poverty and especially the practice of lay mendicancy, and at the root of these issues lay ultimately the more basic and longstanding conflict between the secular clergy and the mendicant orders of the church.
Sectors have in the past criticized the program for being a dole-out that encourages mendicancy among the poor.