mendicant

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mendicant

1. (of a member of a religious order) dependent on alms for sustenance
2. a mendicant friar
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the bluecoat boy at Christ's Hospital, Elia is dependent upon the readers of the London Magazine to vouch for his merit as an author, and their subscriptions, like those of the Christ's Hospital Governors and the Mendicity Society members, sustain his "life.
Elia's entire argument against the Mendicity Society is based upon a rehearsal of stereotypes about poverty including the inherent dignity of the homeless, their loyal canine companions, their public performances, and their ability to serve as the topics of stilted Latin poetry.
The First Report of the Society Established in London for the Suppression of Mendicity.
Bodkin, The First Report of the Society Established in London for the Suppression of Mendicity (London: Bentley, 1818), 12.
51) Even before Vacher's arrest and trial, many agreed with Camille Ferdinand-Dreyfus' statement that "the reform of our legislation governing vagabondage and mendicity is the most urgent of the social questions.
53) Employing a questionable but all-too-common logic, Charles Dupuy argued in an 1888 report he presented to both the Conseil superieur de l'assistance publique and to parliament, that there was a direct link between the expansion of the welfare bureaus throughout the century and the rise in vagabondage and mendicity.
A cousin of the huge literature on 'degeneration' which Daniel Pick has studied, hundreds and hundreds of articles, books, treatises and theses appeared in several languages, chiefly French, German and Italian, on the medical roots of vagabondage and mendicity.
Experience demonstrates that whether it take place in the country or the city, mendicity practiced by the elderly or the infirm is a racket which does not even aid the wretched poor themselves.
His successor noted in 1887: "The increase in the number of cases of vagabondage and mendicity, which has taken place in particular since 1883, coincides with the economic crisis from which the continent had suffered since then.
77) Throughout the period 1880-1914, the following journals regularly contained articles on vagabondage and mendicity written in the same spirit: the Revue philanthropique, Revue des etablissements de bienfaisance, La reforme sociale, Journal des economistes, Le Temps, Revue d' economie politique, Revue politique et parlementaire, Revue penitentiaire, Revue des prisons, and the Archives de l' Anthropologie criminelle, to name but a
A law p During the 1880s and 1890s, over one-half of the nation's departmental general councils had sent petitions to Paris demanding a draconian law to suppress mendicity and for effective machinery to enforce it.
In 1894, the Minister of Justice announced that it was official government policy to crack down on mendicity and vagabondage.