menstrual period


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Related to menstrual period: ovulation

menstrual period

[′men·strə·wəl ′pir·ē·əd]
(physiology)
The time of menstruation.
References in periodicals archive ?
6,7] A study by Taipale and Hiilesma [7] showed that ultrasound is more accurate than last menstrual period date in dating, and when it was used as the prime determinant of gestational age the number of post-term pregnancies reduced.
5 years of symptoms after the final menstrual period (FMP) for the subset of 881 women who identified a definite FMP (JAMA Intern.
This causes fluid retention which disappears after the menstrual period.
If you've always have a trouble-free menstrual period and the pains are sudden, you might want to think about visiting a clinic or your family doctor
He said the term "menstrual migraine" is used mainly to describe migraines that occur in women who have almost all of their headaches from two days before to one day after their menstrual periods and declining levels of estrogen at the onset of menses is likely to be the cause of menstrual migraines.
It was amazing to discover that 90 percent didn't know what a menstrual period was before they had their first one.
Without such love, estrogen will be high, lack of ovulation during menstrual periods, digestion issues, unrelenting stress, unresolved emotional issues, poor diet and anxiety," explained Dr Taher.
But menopause itself--as defined by health care professionals--is a woman's final menstrual period, which can be confirmed after she goes 12 consecutive months with no period, and no other biological or physiological cause can be identified; it also may occur when both ovaries are surgically removed or damaged.
More precisely, in the year before and after her final menstrual period a woman is likely to experience substantial increases in total cholesterol levels.
Those who used the pill within 30 days of their last menstrual period had elevated odds of preterm birth and low birth weight, conditions that are associated with infant morbidity and mortality.
According to Paul Winchester, MD, Indiana University School of Medicine professor of clinical pediatrics, the lead author of the study, "Elevated concentrations of pesticides and other agrichemicals in surface water during April through July coincided with significantly higher risk of birth defects in live births conceived by women whose last menstrual period began in the same months.
1 million US births from 1996 to 2002, researchers found a strong association between an increased number of birth defects in children of women whose last menstrual period occurred in April, May, June or July and elevated levels of nitrates, atrazine and other pesticides in surface water in the same months.