mental

(redirected from mental disorder)
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Related to mental disorder: schizophrenia, personality disorder

mental

1
1. affected by mental illness
2. concerned with care for persons with mental illness
3. Slang insane

mental

2
Anatomy of or relating to the chin

mental

[′men·təl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to the chin. Also known as genial.
(psychology)
Pertaining to the mind, psyche, or inner self.
Pertaining to the intellectual or cognitive functions.
Imaginary or unreal, as when a pain is said to be purely mental.
References in periodicals archive ?
Professor Stephen Spiro , deputy chair of the British Lung Foundation, said that persuading people with mental disorders to give up smoking was a major challenge but so was identifying smokers who could need psychiatric treatment.
According to Kessler, mental disorders were found to be significantly related to alcohol/drug use disorders.
Like most developing countries, about 85 percent of individuals with mental disorders in Lebanon lack access to mental health treatment.
71percent daily increase in hospitalisations for mental disorders.
Most participants (76%) identified at least one possible risk factor for the development of a postevent mental disorder (M = 1.
Then labels are given to the behaviors and they're classified as diseases or mental disorders.
These numbers show that new mothers may be more susceptible to mental disorders than fathers for the months immediately after childbirth.
Untreated early-onset mental disorders are associated with school failure, teenage chilbearing, use of alcohol and illegal drugs, suicide, unstable employment, early marriage, and more.
Among other things, they argue that some so-called mental illnesses are genuine brain diseases, although their precise etiologies have not been figured out yet; that if mental illness is a myth, so is physical illness, because both categories have fuzzy boundaries and are to a large extent culturally determined; that viewing mental illness as a myth is a fiction that is necessary to maintain the integrity of psychotherapy as a moral enterprise; and that the distinction between mental and physical disease is misleading, since (as the American Psychiatric Association puts it) "there is much that is 'physical' in mental disorders and much 'mental' in 'physical' disorders.
Leading psychiatric agencies such as the world Psychiatric Association and the US National Institute of Mental Health admit that psychiatrists do not know the causes or cures for any mental disorder or what their 'treatments' specifically do to the patient.
On the other side, a child with a mental disorder such as ADHD or Asperger's, whether gifted or not, will be done a grave disservice if not properly diagnosed and treated.
The mortality rate for individuals with anorexia proves greater than any other mental disorder and has been shown to be as high as 15% (American Psychiatric Association, 2000; Phelps & Bajorek, 1991; Reijonen et al.