mercuric acetate

mercuric acetate

[mər′kyu̇r·ik ′as·ə‚tāt]
(organic chemistry)
Hg(C2H3O2)2 Poisonous, light-sensitive white crystals; soluble in alcohol and water; used in medicine and as a catalyst in organic synthesis. Also known as mercury acetate.
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41%), while by lowest used concentration of phenyl mercuric acetate drop of T and B-cells GSH was 2.
Effect of phenyl mercuric acetate on human T and B lymphocyt Gomal J Med Sci 2014;3;156-60.
The most important sources of contaminating agricultural soil have been the use of organic mercurials as a seed-coat dressing to prevent fungal diseases in seeds, of mercury sulphate as a root dip, and of phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA) for the treatment of apple scab (Frank et al.
Treatment of seeds of two Phaseolus aureus [Vigna radiata] cultivars with higher concentrations of mercuric acetate inhibited germination, hypocotyl length, mobilization of total nitrogen from cotyledons to seedlings, and protease activity in seeds during germination (Varshney, 1990).
Inhibition of chloroplast reactions with phenyl mercuric acetate.
Response of barley (Hordeum vulgare) to different fertility levels and phenyl mercuric acetate under tank bed condition.
Effects of phenyl mercuric acetate on stomatal and cuticular resistance to transpiration.
Light dependent volume changes and reactions in chloroplasts: Action of alkenyl succinic acid and phenyl mercuric acetate and possible relation to mechanisms of stomatal control.