mere


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mere

1
1. Dialect or archaic a lake or marsh
2. Obsolete the sea or an inlet of it

mere

2
Archaic a boundary or boundary marker

mere

[mīr]
(hydrology)
A large pond or a shallow lake.
References in classic literature ?
We shall reach, however, more immediately a distinct conception of what the true Poetry is, by mere reference to a few of the simple elements which induce in the Poet himself the poetical effect He recognizes the ambrosia which nourishes his soul in the bright orbs that shine in Heaven--in the volutes of the flower--in the clustering of low shrubberies--in the waving of the grain-fields--in the slanting of tall eastern trees -- in the blue distance of mountains -- in the grouping of clouds-- in the twinkling of half-hidden brooks--in the gleaming of silver rivers --in the repose of sequestered lakes--in the star-mirroring depths of lonely wells.
The woman nodded slightly at Maggie and the mere boy, "'Scuse me.
Of course, at first, much was mere blundering experiment.
Some ill-conditioned persons who sneer at the life-matrimonial, may perhaps suggest, in this place, that the good couple would be better likened to two principals in a sparring match, who, when fortune is low and backers scarce, will chivalrously set to, for the mere pleasure of the buffeting; and in one respect indeed this comparison would hold good; for, as the adventurous pair of the Fives' Court will afterwards send round a hat, and trust to the bounty of the lookers-on for the means of regaling themselves, so Mr Godfrey Nickleby and HIS partner, the honeymoon being over, looked out wistfully into the world, relying in no inconsiderable degree upon chance for the improvement of their means.
It may, however, be mentioned that mere inventors of revolvers, fire-shooting carbines, and similar small arms, met with little consideration.
That the mere physiological importance of an organ does not determine its classificatory value, is almost shown by the one fact, that in allied groups, in which the same organ, as we have every reason to suppose, has nearly the same physiological value, its classificatory value is widely different.
Mysterious as this circumstance appears to be, it is not more surprising than that the body of one's fellow-creature, directly after death, and before putrefaction has commenced, should often be of so deleterious a quality, that the mere puncture from an instrument used in its dissection, should prove fatal.
Carlyle called democracy 'mobocracy' and considered it a mere bad piece of social and political machinery, or, in his own phrase, a mere
And the pilot--that is to say, the true pilot--is he a captain of sailors or a mere sailor?
Twixt the spurious heavenly, And spurious earthly, Round us roving, round us soaring,-- MERE FOOL
Philosophers, on the other hand, have maintained often that matter is a mere fiction imagined by mind, and sometimes that mind is a mere property of a certain kind of matter.
You know perfectly well that the mere idea of marriage has always scared you.