meridian angle

meridian angle

See hour angle.

meridian angle

[mə′rid·ē·ən ‚aŋ·gəl]
(astronomy)
Angular distance east or west of the local celestial meridian; the arc of the celestial equator, or the angle at the celestial pole, between the upper branch of the local celestial meridian and the hour circle of a celestial body, measured eastward or westward from the local celestial meridian through 180°, and labeled E or W to indicate the direction of measurement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, zero meridian angle, and therefore zero longitude, has been the observatory in Greenwich, England.
Its angles are: the Meridian Angle at the Pole, the Azimuthal Angle at the observer, and the Parallactic Angle at the Geographical Position.
longitude and observer longitude to obtain Meridian Angle.
Using Meridian Angle, observer latitude and declination (from Nautical Almanac) determine star altitude (from H.
Add (subtract) the new Meridian Angle to (from) the constant longitude of the fettered star's G.
and the observer to obtain the unfettered star's Meridian Angle.
214 with unfettered star's Meridian Angle and declination, and the observer's latitude to find the new altitude.
SHA is used to calculate Meridian Angle of navigational triangle as in abdal calculations above.