mesoclimate

mesoclimate

[¦me·zō¦klī·mət]
(climatology)
The climate of small areas of the earth's surface which may not be representative of the general climate of the district.
A climate characterized by moderate temperatures, that is, in the range 20-30°C. Also known as mesothermal climate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crum SM Shiflett SA Jenerette GD The influence of vegetation, mesoclimate and meteorology on urban atmospheric microclimates across a coastal to desert climate gradient J Environ Manage 2017 200295303 https://doi.
In the humid piedmont, the mesoclimate is wet and warm, with annual rainfall >1,000 mm (concentrated in the summer) and potential evapotranspiration about 900 mm.
Vegetation mainly influences the micro- and mesoclimate through shading and evapotranspiration (Andrade and Vieira 2007; Bernatzky 1982; Endlicher 2012; Georgi and Dimitriou 2010; Huang et al.
Winegrowers in the Mornington Peninsula region, Victoria, Australia, provide a good example from the New World of a conscious effort being made to relate their Pinot Noir wines to subtle differences in the soil and mesoclimate (see photo on book cover).
Macro--and mesoclimate of the campos de altitude and affinities with high mountain climates of the tropical Andes and Costa Rica.
The term microclimate, however, is often misused in place of mesoclimate to describe the meteorological conditions at a given vineyard.
Numerical results are presented for six locations in Venezuela representing different mesoclimate types: La Mariposa (Miranda State); San Francisco de Macanao (Nueva Esparta State); Villa El Rosario (Zulia State); Machiques (Zulia State); Carora (Lara State); and San Carlos de Rio Negro (Amazonas State).
While the macroclimate will influence the wine, it is the mesoclimate (the climate of a specific vineyard site) and the microclimate (the climate of the grape cluster) that give wine its distinctive personality.
Local conditions that influence the weather in a particular vineyard or portion of a vineyard are referred to as the mesoclimate or microclimate.
The process involved overlaying data on macroclimate and mesoclimate, such as frost dates, frequency of extreme low temperatures, degree days, aspect, slope, present land use, and soils.
The growing season and heat unit accumulation data in Table 2 suggest that the climate in Parma is marginal for cultivation of Merlot and Chardonnay and not suitable for production of Cabernet Sauvignon or Syrah, yet vineyard heat unit accumulation and number of frost-free days suggest a suitable vineyard mesoclimate for production of these red wine cultivars.