mestizo

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Related to mestizos: creole, mestiza, Mestico, Peninsulares

mestizo

(māstē`sō) [Span.,=mixture], person of mixed race; particularly, in Mexico and Central and South America, a person of European (Spanish or Portuguese) and indigenous descent. The mestizos constitute a large part of the population in several Latin American countries; they are in various places also called by other names, e.g., ladinos in Guatemala, caboclos in Brazil. The word is primarily applied to a mixture of racial strains, but it has acquired social and cultural connotations; it may be applied to pure-blooded indigenous people who adopt European dress and customs. All persons of mixed race are called mestizos in the Philippines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Land used to be the main source of wealth of the Spanish mestizos, but now it has been parceled into small spaces for condominiums that cater to the new middle class.
Her book offers a methodology to reconsider the construction of shared cultural knowledge between creole and mestizo communities.
This brings to mind another mestizo our President swore at not long ago: US President Barack Obama, who had a white mother.
Americans stationed in conquered Philippines during the early 20th century were confused when their offspring by native Filipinas were referred to as American mestizos, says Molnar, because they were only familiar with the racial categories of white and other.
Por otro lado, se han realizado estudios donde se menciona la predisposicion de animales mestizos a desarrollar neoplasias especificas (Bravo et al.
Por otro lado, el 68,9% fueron perros mestizos y 31,1% fueron de raza pura.
They allied with the Crown in challenging the abuses of local encomendero elites, and the latter mounted vituperative legal cases against them, vilifying them as mestizos who would corrupt the natives.
Thus, while chapter one deftly shows how honour and lineage, as opposed to phenotype, permeated categories, including those historians have deemed to be racialized as in the case of mestizos, chapter two delves deeply into how local social networks created the conditions necessary for the classification of rural individuals as mestizos and mulattos.
Empirical findings suggest that, the majority ethnic group, Mestizo, earned, on average, statistically less than the Creole, Garifuna and Mixed groups in both years.
En el primer ensayo se examina la importancia de los memoriales para la legitimidad y autoridad de estos denominados mestizos reales, es decir, el hijo de espanol e india noble.
The Disappearing Mestizo es una obra que logra superar esta dicotomia epistemologica, penetrando en un espacio intermedio poco explorado y, por lo mismo, considerablemente revelador.
Furthermore, the highland mestizo and coastal criollo divide that characterizes Peru's national ethnic imaginary complicates the mestizo/Indian dichotomy in that highland mestizos are likewise positioned in an inferior social status relative to the nation's coastal urban criollo elite.