metabolic cost

metabolic cost

[¦med·ə‚bäl·ik ′kȯst]
(industrial engineering)
The amount of energy consumed as the result of performing a given work task; usually expressed in calories.
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The metabolic cost of a structure like the brain is mainly dependent on how big it is, and many animals have bigger brain-to-body mass ratios than humans.
If you can cut the metabolic cost to that performance by 25 percent, it's a dramatic increase in capability.
In this study, we measured the metabolic cost of protein synthesis and determined whether this cost was influenced by genotype, phenotype, or environment.
2], and overall energy expenditure, resulting in significantly less metabolic cost to the post-stroke individual compared to walking on an overground treadmill.
So venom production is an expensive phenomenon in terms of metabolic cost.
metabolic cost intrigued the UC-Boulder researchers.
The study is one of the first to measure the metabolic cost, or calories burned, of changing walking speeds, Medical Today reported.
It is tentatively suggested that respiration frequency may be a more sensitive indicator of exertion, and appears to have been an early indicator of elevations in metabolic cost (heart rate, oxygen uptake and ventilation) as well as RPE that would manifest at 7 km.
Such deviations may impact interpretation of the relationship between metabolic cost and BWS.
Researchers said that the older adults who regularly participated in highaerobic activities, such as running, have a "lower metabolic cost of walking" than older, more sedentary adults.
The researchers found that those who ran had a 7 to 10 percent lower metabolic cost than sedentary adults and those who regularly walked for exercise.