metabolize

(redirected from metabolized)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to metabolized: metabolise

metabolize

[mə′tab·ə‚līz]
(physiology)
To transform by metabolism; to subject to metabolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approximately 25 percent of all prescription drugs are metabolized by the enzymes measured by the AmpliChip(R) test.
For example, if the route is ingestion, much of the chlorpyrifos may be metabolized to TCPy in the first pass effect before chlorpyrifos reaches the maternal systemic blood supply and hence the placenta (Figure 2).
In some cases, drugs become active only after they are metabolized.
Kuchera stated, "Nitrite serves as a marker for release of nitric oxide into the circulation since nitric oxide itself is metabolized within a few seconds.
CYP2D6 codes for enzymes that metabolize chemicals such as medications that target the central nervous system (including various antidepressants, stimulants, and codeine--all drugs with different chemical structures), drugs of abuse, neurotoxicants, procarcinogens (substances that become carcinogenic only when metabolized into more reactive compounds), and even the body's own neurotransmitters.
Scientists have long known that the human body initially metabolizes about 90 percent of its nicotine load into cotinine, which is then further metabolized into a variety of other compounds.
First, cyclophosphamide must be metabolized in the liver to produce the activated metabolites that are toxic to the cancer cells.
In addition to the compound's ability to target aberrant blood vessels, OXi4503 appears to be metabolized in tumor tissue to an agent which may enhance tumor cell killing.
Further, as indicated above, DEHP is rapidly metabolized to its corresponding monoester, MEHP [mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate].
Many drugs are metabolized in the intestines before they can enter the blood.
The studies were conducted in England and designed to investigate the potential of oral AVI-4557 to inhibit expression of CYP and alter the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, an anesthetic drug metabolized by CYP.
Morton says the models could be used to study the fate of a molecule, from administration of or exposure to a toxic compound, to distribution to tissues through metabolism, to excretion--"imagine a toxic agent as a signal that enters the body and gets processed or metabolized, and the outcome is disease in the human body," he explains.