Glycon

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Glycon

(glī`kən), fl. c.3d cent. A.D., Athenian sculptor and copyist. He executed the Farnese Hercules after the original by Lysippos.
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Thus, the researchers sought to assess the efficacy and safety of metformin as an adjunct therapy in overweight adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
The effects of metformin as a breast cancer target have been studied extensively.
Today I showed you that metformin increases MMA, dose dependently and progressively over time," he added.
Currently, products of Sino-American Shanghai Squibb occupy about 80% of the metformin market in China while the rest of the market share is taken up by such companies as Liling and Hebei Ideal & Hightech Pharmaceutical Co.
The lactic acidosis from metformin is primarily type B.
INVOKAMET is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are not adequately controlled by treatment that includes either canagliflozin or metformin, or who are already being treated with both canagliflozin and metformin as separate medications.
Dr Triggle, who is the lead principal investigator of a Qatar Foundation-sponsored National Priorities Research Programme project exploring the effects of diabetes on the vascular system, said that metformin has long been known to reduce morbidity in patients with diabetes-associated microvascular disease, but that until now the reason for this beneficial effect had not been understood.
The most common cause of death for diabetes patients is vascular and microvascular deterioration - it's like an advanced aging of the vascular system - so metformin is an extremely useful drug.
As a result, metformin is on a fast track to clinical testing.
However, if you give both, the benefit is additive, which is consistent with their data that metformin and MK2 work through different biochemical pathways.
Although metformin use was associated with a lower risk of cancer-specific mortality, our CIs were wide and not statistically significant when adjusted for clinical and tumour characteristics (HR, 0.
The scientists gave one of two different doses of metformin to middle-aged male mice and found that lower doses increased lifespan by about five percent, and also delayed the onset of age-associated diseases.